1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

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genehouse
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by genehouse » Mon Jan 12, 2015 12:09 pm

Is there a way for you to adapt something like this for your needs? This is what I was thinking about the last time I was considering rebuilding a 288.

Gene
Engine Cradle.jpg
Engine Cradle.jpg (11.24 KiB) Viewed 4140 times
1949 Super 8 Limousine
1939 Buick Special
1926 Star 6
1926 Star Landau (still in AZ waiting for me to pick it up!)

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Tinman_70
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Tue Jan 13, 2015 9:33 am

Gene,

A friend of mine gave me a couple of engine stands that he no longer needed. I'm going to attach one to the back of the engine and attach it to the back of a cherry picker hoist near where the ram mounts. Then attach some brackets to the front of the engine and support them on the wide end of the hoist. The problem is trying to find an attachment point on the front of the engine. There are only a few places to attach the brackets, may bolt them on to the water pump mounting holes.

Engine has been stripped. Here's where I've gotten with the engine stand. The engine needs to be turned around so the back is at the narrow end of the hoist.

Joe
P1130668.jpg
One of the engine stands fit better to the narrow bellhousing bolt pattern
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Tinman_70
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Sat Jan 17, 2015 7:49 am

Packard Eight Engine Stand – Rear Section

The size and weight of the Packard 8 won’t allow it to be mounted on a standard engine stand (IMO). I’m working on a design to allow the front of the engine to be supported while on the stand. This design will not allow the engine to be rotated but will allow most of the work to be done on the engine.
To make the back section of the stand requires the upright parts of a regular engine stand and a one-ton hoist.
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The ram and boom of the hoist were removed and a piece of heavy grade 3” by 3” angle iron bolted in its place with Grade 8 bolts.
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The bottom of the engine stand upright is sawed off the remove the parts that are not needed. The upright is positioned on the angle iron and held in place with right angle magnets and tack welded to the angle iron.
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The rear section of the stand is test fit to the engine. The engine is leveled and measurements taken to determine the materials needed to support the front of the engine on the legs of the hoist.
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The welding of the upright to the angle iron was completed with a MIG welder.
P1161178.jpg
This part of the engine stand was completed by adding supports from the upright to the hoist.
P1161177.jpg
The material has been gathered to now work on the front section of the engine stand.
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Tinman_70
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Tue Jan 20, 2015 10:07 am

Front Section of Engine Stand - 1

These are the parts for the front of the engine stand – 2 pieces of 3”X3” angle iron, a bracket to bolt to the water pump holes on the block, a length of solid rectangular steel and 2 lengths of 1” square tubing.
P1171179.jpg
The water pump bracket was secured to the block with socket-head cap screws and the solid steel bar was cut to size and positioned on the centerline of the crankshaft making it offset to the head. The end of the steel cross piece was drilled for 3/8” bolts and MIG welded to the bracket.
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The 1” square tubing side supports had tabs welded and drilled to attach to the cross piece.
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The hardest part was transferring the engine from the hoist to the new stand. The legs were in the way so the engine had to be lifted with a cable hoist from a steel roof rafter.
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Once it was leveled and blocked up on the new stand, the engine was centered on the stand before the side supports were added.
P1191187.jpg

Continued
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Tue Jan 20, 2015 10:53 am

Front Section of Engine Stand – Finish

With the engine level, the 1” square tubing side supports were cut to size and drilled for 3/8” bolts. Tabs to mount the side supports were cut from steel plate and drilled and bolted to the tubing. They were fitted to the 3” angle iron, marked, removed and tack welded. Once they were checked for fit, they were removed and MIG welded.
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The side supports were permanently mounted. A hole was drilled in the angle iron and into the leg of the hoist to keep the angle iron in the correct position.
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At this point the stand was complete. It rolls around easily on the wheels and while the engine will not rotate, it should allow most of the work that needs to be done to the engine.
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The total cost was 4 days work and about $130. I bought the hoist at a Harbor Freight garage sale for less than $100. It was a new floor model. The engine stand parts can be easily removed and converted back to a hoist. The parts from the old engine stand were free but could have been made from standard material. All the bolts holding this contraption together are high-strength Grade 8. The last thing I need is to have the engine drop on my foot!
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Tinman_70
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Wed Jan 21, 2015 8:14 am

The only problem I seem to have created with my engine stand contraption is that it blocks the removal of the water distribution tube. Cleaning the tube is apparently a "must do". When it gets time for that, the engine will have to be blocked up on the legs of the stand, the front support removed and the tube removed, cleaned and replaced.
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Wed Jan 28, 2015 9:26 am

Cleaning the Engine

The engine had good oil pressure, doesn’t smoke and runs smooth, so a full rebuild is not intended at this point, just an inspection, cleanup, new gaskets and a repaint.

Before removing the head, the oil pan and the front cover, the engine needed to be cleaned. A power washer was used to get the grime off so the openings on the block needed to closed up to prevent water getting in. All the openings were filled with paper, plastic and/or duct tape. The gaskets on the valve spring covers were bad, so they were cleaned off and some inexpensive weather stripping was added to seal them from water.
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The loose grease was scrapped off first then degreaser was sprayed on and the block was hand wire brushed. It was power washed with clear water. This was repeated several times until most of the grease was off. The block was then sprayed with paint remover and wire brushed to loosen the green paint. Then power washed. This was also repeated until all the paint was removed.
P1271228.jpg

After all the grease and paint were removed, the block was washed with soap and water and sprayed with WD40 to keep it from rusting until it is painted. The area around the exhaust and intake ports will be cleaned dry rather than taking a chance of getting water into the cylinders.
P1271229.jpg
The 4th core plug is the new one that was test fitted
P1271230.jpg
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Dave Czirr
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Dave Czirr » Wed Jan 28, 2015 9:44 am

This might be a good time to consider removing the core plugs and also water-blasting the cooling system internals.

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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Thu Jan 29, 2015 6:58 am

Dave,

I was able to remove the core plugs and the water distribution tube. Due to corrosion, some were harder to remove. The distribution tube slid right out. The situation in the water jackets was not good. In addition to scale and rust there were remains of deteriorated water hoses including pieces of the spring that was inside the hose. The block could use a good chemical bath but I'm trying to avoid that as it would require the complete dis-assembly of the engine. When it warms up today, I'm going to roll it outside and flush the block.
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Water distribution tube and old core plugs
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Some plugs were harder than others
P1281234.jpg
A lot of rust and scale behind plugs
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Dave Czirr » Thu Jan 29, 2015 7:07 am

At some point in the future when the cooling system is back together you might consider the old standard oxalic acid (followed by neutralizer) treatment for any remaining rust that you can't flush out.

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