1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

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Tinman_70
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Sat Apr 04, 2020 8:27 am

Plugging away with the re-wiring. Not a great deal of urgency since the city, county and state are basically shut down for the control of the virus. Too bad because it is prefect weather for a cruise and car show! I'm working on the turn signals now. All the connectors have been added to the turn signal harness. The other end of the wires from the flasher, brake switch and front and rear turn signal bulbs are being routed and will have the corresponding end of the connectors will be added and connected. I've complicated the wiring a bit by tapping into the front parking light turn signal circuits so that the will be both right and left turn indicators lights rather than the single original indicator.
12V_30.jpg
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Tinman_70
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Fri Apr 10, 2020 10:01 am

All the re-wiring is finished. The last item wired was the interface for the GPS speedometer. Could not find a Hall Effect pulse generator for the OD speedometer gear so the GPS unit was the best choice to drive the electronic speedometer. The end of an old speedometer cable was used to plug the speedometer cable hole in the transmission. The wires are raggedly tied up with plastic cable ties until the testing is completed then they will be more neatly bunched. After all the testing is completed, the AC and defrost hoses will be added and the dash buttoned back up.
12V_31.jpg
Speedometer interface - electrical connections on left for 12V + & - and the speedometer connection. GPS antenna on the right side.
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Tinman_70
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Thu Apr 16, 2020 7:18 am

All the 12 volt re-wiring has been completed and everything that can be tested without the car running has been tested and checks OK. The new light switch allows the parking lights to be on with the headlights. The amber parking lights give the car a distinct different look. The taillights are using high output 1157 dual filament bulbs. They are 50/14 CP versus the original 6V 21/3 CP. Very bright and easy to see.
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The next task is to get the car up in the air and drop the gas tank to change the fuel level sender and replace the 6 volt electric fuel pump. Then the engine can be fired and the AC unit vacuumed and charged and checked for operation.
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Tinman_70
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Fri Apr 17, 2020 10:13 am

Dropped the gas tank to replace the fuel level sender to match the new 12V gauges. The gas tank has a drain plug in the bottom. Pulled the plug and drained about a half a tank of ethanol-free fuel in to a couple of new Home Depot buckets. Immediately used a battery powered fuel pump to pump it into a regular gas container.
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Once the tank was empty, the fuel line was disconnected along with my fabricated fuel filler tube. A floor jack with a towel was used to support the tank as the 2 rear tank strap bolts were detached. The tank was lowered enough to unhook the old sender wires.
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My original tank was not usable so the tank I'm using is from a 1953/54 Chevy car. The general dimensions are similar to the original but modifications were required for the fuel line, filler tube and the frame brackets for the mounting straps. It holds 16 gallons and has provisions for an in-tank EFI pump.
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The new sending unit was adjusted to fit the size of the tank and installed. The procedure to remove the tank was reversed to re-install it. Rolled under the car and raised far enough to connect the sender wires then raised up and bolted in place and all the lines connected. Must note that it is easier to remove than re-install!
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Hmmm - Maybe an EFI conversion in the future?
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The task in the project is to replace the 6V fuel pump.
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Tinman_70
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Tue Apr 21, 2020 8:06 am

While the car is up in the air, the 6V electric fuel pump assembly is being replaced. My original setup was well thought out with a canister fuel filter, Carter 6V rotary vane fuel pump and a fuel regulator to keep the electric pump from over running the carburetor. Unfortunately, the setup failed to work as designed. Either the pump or the regulator was making it difficult for the newly rebuilt mechanical pump draw enough fuel to the carburetor. Had to run the electric pump full time. To solve that problem, I installed a bypass line with a one-way check valve around the filter, pump and regulator. it didn't work much better. Rotary vane pumps and regulators are good and reliable but probably not a good choice as an auxiliary pump behind a mechanical engine pump.
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On the new assembly, the regulatory is removed and the 6V pump replaced with a new Carter electric pump that will free-flow fuel when off. I wanted a pump that would use hard line fittings. I prefer not to use barb fittings and rubber hoses in the fuel lines unless absolutely necessary. The only problem with this pump is that it requires a special metric O-ring fitting which was a bit more difficult to adapt to the NPT thread in the fuel filter. Was able to adapt it with an AN coupler and added a metal piece to the mounting bracket to support the new pump. Once it is installed and tested, should be able to fire the engine back up.
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Carter inline 12V pump
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Coupling between pump and filter
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Extended mounting bracket

While the car is up, also remove the speedometer cable and the vacuum line to the wiper motor that are no longer needed.
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Wed Jun 17, 2020 11:21 am

After quarantine and an extended vacation, I'm back working on the '49 Packard to complete the 12V conversion and AC addition. The wiring is completed and being tested. To test the fuel gauge, 15 gallons of non-ethanol gas was added to the tank. The gauge only showed half full. The tank is an 18 gallon 1953 Chevy tank so I know that's not right. The sending unit resistance range is 240 ohms empty and 33 ohms full. Tested the gauge and wiring at a terminal block in the trunk by installing a 25W 35 ohm resister in the gauge wiring while bypassing the sender. The gauge registered full as it should have, so the problem was in the sender. Drained the gas from the tank and removed the tank. Removed the sender from the tank and wired it to test it while out of the tank. It worked fine empty, half full and full. Apparently, there was a bad connection on the ground side of the sender due to insulated gaskets on the mounting screws. Re-grounded the sender, installed it and replaced the gas tank. Refilled the tank with the 15 gallons of gas and the gauge read just below full. Took a whole day to do this for a simple ground problem!
Attachments
12V_48.jpg
After draining, the tank came out.
12V_49.jpg
Sender to gauge tested out of the car.
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Fri Jun 19, 2020 10:16 am

After sitting for almost a year while the car was completely re-wired to convert to 12V and add AC, I turned on the new electric fuel pump to prime the carb, turned the key and pressed the starter, the engine fired right to life. The new 12V Pertronix ignition system works great. All the gauges work properly and actually have numbers rather than letters. The volt meter shows that the alternator has output at low engine speed.

Once the engine checked out, it was time to get the AC working. An AC gauge set was attached to the service ports on the compressor and a vacuum pump connected to the system to check for leaks and evacuate the system of air and moisture. After running the pump for about 10 minutes, the valves on the gauge set were closed and the suction-side gauge check for any drop in vacuum that would indicate a leak in the system. When no leaks were evident, the vacuum pump was turned back on and run for another 30 minutes to assure the system was clear of moisture. The valves were closed and the hose to the vacuum pump removed and attached to a 20 pound cylinder of R134a freon. The hose was purged than the cylinder was inverted to allow liquid freon to be drawn into the system. Once sufficient refrigerant was drawn into the system, the cylinder turned back over to allow freon gas to flow into the system. At that point, the engine was started and the AC turned on with a medium blower speed. Once the suction and pressure reading were at the desired levels, the gas was shutoff. The air temperature coming from the vents was checked and found to be 40 degrees, which is just about right! I'm by no means an auto AC expert but I have a good friend who is and he gave me the complete instructions on what to do and loaned me his gauge set. Working on a newly installed system is fairly simple, troubleshooting system problems is probably much more difficult! I'm running without a mechanical engine fan for now, only the electric fan. I have plans for adding an engine fan if cooling becomes a problem on the road. In the shop running the engine with the air on for extended periods, the temperature never got over 180 degrees. We'll see what happens on a hot Florida day.

I need to finish lacing up all the under dash wires and add the AC and defrost hoses. The dash can be buttoned back up then it won't be long before the car is back on the road!
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Thu Jun 25, 2020 6:35 am

All the under-hood work for the 12 volt conversion and AC addition to my '49 Club Sedan is completed. The engine is running fine and the AC is blowing cold. Just waiting for a replacement part before putting the dash back together, the front seat back in and steering wheel back on. Doesn't look too un-original! The 2 Optimal 6 volt batteries were re-jumpered for 12 volts, added a Newport electric wiper motor, 12 volt to 6 volt electronic overdrive relay, Pertronix 12 volt ignition, 3,000 CFM electric fan, 100 amp GM alternator and the Sanden AC compressor and hoses with a custom-made mounting bracket. Missing is the oil filter and the engine fan on the water pump, ran out of room. We'll see how it handles the Florida heat without the engine fan. The original heater box and blower were replaced by the heat/defrost section of the AC unit. Can't wait for the car shows to open back up!
Underhood_2.jpg
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Thu Jul 02, 2020 9:52 am

Finished the under hood work now it's work on the dash. The wiring is completed and the wires are laced up with plastic ties. With the AC and the new gauges and switches there is a lot more wire. Had to add an additional fuse panel to support the AC and electric wipers. Added the defroster duct work from the AC unit to the original defrost vents. The only problem was that the original vents were 2" but the defrost hoses are 2 1/2". Took a piece of heavy clear plastic 2" tube, heated it and slipped it over the vent then put the duct hose over it for a snug fit. Cut and installed the AC dash vent hoses temporarily to check the routing and fit. It's very tight, behind the dash is stuffed! I need to come up with some support for the hoses then it will be ready to button up the dash.
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Dash wiring behind the gauge panel. Auxiliary fuse panel on the firewall.
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Wiring behind the switch panel. Ground buss for the switches and AC. AC control panel wiring on the far right.
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3" dash vent AC hoses take up the spare room behind the dash.
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Sat Jul 04, 2020 7:47 am

Got the dash back in place and attached the hood release brackets and the AC unit to the lower dash. The AC control panel with vertical slide switches fit snugly where the radio block-off plate mounted. Just plain lucky with that! The center AC vent is mounted below the switches where the original heater controls were located. On the same panel as the AC vent, on the left is the switch for the 2-speed electric windshield wipers and on the right is a toggle switch to turn on the courtesy lights. The Autometer gauges were fitted to the original gauge bezels. On the right, a 4-gauge unit with temperature, voltage, fuel level and oil pressure replaced the non-working clock. On the left is an electronic speedometer replacing the broken original mechanical speedometer. The speedometer is driven by a GPS antenna mounted on the dash. The original Packard ignition switch is maintained but the starter is activated by a push button switch in the original switch cluster. Right and left turn signal and high beam indicators are added where the original gauges were located. Below that, are indicator lamps to show the operation of the electric fan, the electric fuel pump and the activation of the overdrive governor.

Need to re-test everything than the project can be finally wrapped up.
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AC_80.jpg
AC vs glovebox? I'll take AC!
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