1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

If you're starting a project, large or small, please share your progress with us in pictures and words.
Dave Czirr
Moderator
Posts: 5093
Joined: Tue Jun 16, 2009 5:30 am
Location: New Jersey

Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Dave Czirr » Thu Jul 02, 2015 10:30 am

I'm glad that some of us have been able to offer help, it's surely been our pleasure to follow along and are looking forward to more as you move forward.

User avatar
Tinman_70
Posts: 818
Joined: Tue May 14, 2013 8:17 am
Location: Tampa Bay, Florida

Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Tue Jul 07, 2015 10:57 am

My long-awaited clutch release bearing didn’t show up so I used the original. The clutch shop told me that the original was good enough to use but I wanted to get a new one. It was only $30 but was apparently out of stock and I couldn’t wait any longer. It was time to mate the transmission to the engine.

Packard has many great designs but I certainly wouldn’t say that the bellhousing, flywheel, pressure plate and release bearing design was one of them. It all starts with the fact that the bellhousing must be installed before the flywheel, pressure plate and disk. Also, the clutch release arm and permanently attached pivot ball have to be installed before the pressure plate and disk, something I found out painfully too late. The installation turned out to be a two-person job. The proper sequence after the bellhousing is bolted to the engine, is to install the flywheel, then bolt the clutch release arm to the bellhousing, then bolt on the clutch and disk to the flywheel using the splined alignment tool. This is where you start to need two people. You can only reach 2 of the 6 pressure plate bolts at a time with the bellhousing in the way. I had my assistant slowly turn the engine over until all 6 bolts were loosely installed then continue to turn it as the bolts were slowly tightened while making sure that the alignment tool was not binding between the pilot bearing and the splines in the clutch disk. Once all the bolts were tight, they were torqued to spec.

It was then time to slide the transmission in using a transmission jack. Because the release bearing is not held in place on the release arm, my helper had reach under from the bottom to hold it on the release arm until it slid on to the collar of the transmission. The infamous return spring had been attached to release bearing first and when the transmission was about ¾” from the face of the bellhousing, a pair of long-nose plyers was used to grab the other end of the spring and attach it to the transmission. Pushing in and turning the transmission while it was in gear, allowed the transmission to completely slide into place. It was then bolted on. As difficult as this was, it had to be easier than doing it with the engine in the car!

I purchased a release arm boot from one of the vendors. It didn’t fit real well so I might try to make my own.
P7071568.jpg
Dare to be Different - Buy and Build Packards!
Member:
Packard Automobile Classics
packardclub.org
packardinfo.com
Series 22/23 Packard Group on Facebook

User avatar
Tinman_70
Posts: 818
Joined: Tue May 14, 2013 8:17 am
Location: Tampa Bay, Florida

Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Thu Jul 09, 2015 10:42 am

It was a small milestone today as the engine and transmission went back into the chassis. Bolted it up, removed the hoist and re-torqued the heads. Next up is installing the clutch and brake linkages, the rest of the transmission mounts, the front steering arms and the driveshaft.
P7091569.jpg
P7091570.jpg
P7091571.jpg
Dare to be Different - Buy and Build Packards!
Member:
Packard Automobile Classics
packardclub.org
packardinfo.com
Series 22/23 Packard Group on Facebook

User avatar
Tinman_70
Posts: 818
Joined: Tue May 14, 2013 8:17 am
Location: Tampa Bay, Florida

Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Sat Jul 11, 2015 9:37 am

The first part to install once the engine and transmission were back in the chassis was the driveshaft. The Packard manual makes the point that with the slip-joint driveshaft, it is critical to make sure that the marks on the driveshaft and front yoke are properly aligned when the yoke is installed into the splines of the driveshaft. When I removed the driveshaft, the marks were off by about 45 degrees. This caused binding of the U-joints and excessive vibration that ruined the rear transmission seal and the front universal joint. To re-install, I found both marks and marked them with a Sharpie. Also checked the alignment with a level at the front and rear U-joints just to make sure I had it right.
P7111572.jpg
P7111573.jpg
When I tried to slide the yoke all the way into the driveshaft, it stopped about 1” from going all the way in. In addition to ruining the seal and U-joint, the mis-alignment also caused unusual wear on the splines of the slip-joint. No amount of “persuasion” would make the yoke go in any further. I had to remove it and file the edges of both the male and female splines before it would slide all the way in. A task that should have taken 20 minutes took over 2 hours. The driveshaft finally was installed.
P7111574.jpg
Dare to be Different - Buy and Build Packards!
Member:
Packard Automobile Classics
packardclub.org
packardinfo.com
Series 22/23 Packard Group on Facebook

User avatar
Tinman_70
Posts: 818
Joined: Tue May 14, 2013 8:17 am
Location: Tampa Bay, Florida

Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Thu Jul 16, 2015 8:25 am

The pedal assemblies and their linkages were installed along with the shift linkage from the engine to the transmission. The steering box and steering linkages were connected so that the car could be moved once the tires are back on the ground. The box may have to be removed to re-install the body. The new master cylinder was installed and a couple of the brake lines had to be tweaked to provide clearance around the steering box and shift linkage. The rest of the rear transmission mounts were attached. Taking lots of pictures before dis-assembly really helps with re-assembly!
P7161577.jpg
P7161578.jpg
P7161579.jpg
P7161580.jpg
I’m currently working on the exhaust and completing the brakes.
Dare to be Different - Buy and Build Packards!
Member:
Packard Automobile Classics
packardclub.org
packardinfo.com
Series 22/23 Packard Group on Facebook

User avatar
Tinman_70
Posts: 818
Joined: Tue May 14, 2013 8:17 am
Location: Tampa Bay, Florida

Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Sun Jul 19, 2015 9:00 am

I’m working on the exhaust system and getting ready to complete the brakes once the new brake shoes arrive.

I looked at “Packard” mufflers but they were a bit expensive. Settled on a Walker Dynomax from Summit Racing (WLK-17613) for $25 and a 2.25” extension pipe from Advance Auto for $7 to position the shorter muffler back from the original header pipe. I made a pattern for the tailpipe from the muffler back and will take it to the muffler shop and have it bent. I reused the original center tailpipe pipe hanger and repositioned it to the back of the muffler.
P7181581.jpg
P7181582.jpg

I bought new brake springs, shoe retainers and star adjusters as a kit. The wheel cylinders were new when I bought the car. The parts that did not come with either the spring kits or the wheel cylinders were the wheel cylinder link pins, the upper shoe retainer washers and the emergency brake linkages and springs. The link pins were found at NAPA, part #80743 for $3 per pair. The washers and emergency brake hardware will be cleaned and reused.
P7181584.jpg
Old and new parts
P7191585.jpg
Wheel cylinder link pins from NAPA
P7191586.jpg
Reused parts - retainer washer and emergency brake hardware
Dare to be Different - Buy and Build Packards!
Member:
Packard Automobile Classics
packardclub.org
packardinfo.com
Series 22/23 Packard Group on Facebook

User avatar
Tinman_70
Posts: 818
Joined: Tue May 14, 2013 8:17 am
Location: Tampa Bay, Florida

Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Mon Aug 03, 2015 6:56 am

I can see why most of the immediate post-war Packard cars wind up as scrape, the cost to restore is very high and unless it is a special model, the value is fairly low. Cost of replacement parts is an important factor, particularly if you don’t know the interchange numbers for parts that are generally-available.

For example, I needed brake shoes for my ’49. I searched the world over for some replacement 12” by 1.75” shoes but couldn’t find any that would fit. When I could not wait any longer, I purchased a set of 4 from a high-priced source doing business as an ebay store. The cost was $168 for parts and shipping. A similar set of replacement Bendix shoes for a ’49 Ford would be less than $50.

While waiting those parts to arrive, I continued to search using different search criteria. I stumbled upon an obscure forum site for International Travelall’s listing numbers for replacement shoes for their 1960s models. The numbers listed were TS30 for NAPA and 30PG for Raybestos. Looked up both and they were 12” by 1.75” with the same pattern as the Packard. I called NAPA but they didn’t stock them and wanted a core charge. I googled 30PG and found that they are generally from Rock Auto, Summit Racing and Amazon. The Lincoln Bendix brakes on my ’39 Ford are also this size so I ordered a pair from Amazon so I could do a direct comparison with the originals. I’ll keep the extras for my Ford. The total cost through Amazon Prime with free shipping was $33.35 for a pair. As the attached picture shows, the metal shoes are identical, all of the holes used to attach the springs and retainers are in the exact same positions. The only difference I could note was that the friction material on the 30PG is slightly thicker than the high-priced replacement but it actually fits the drum a little better.
P8031588.jpg
On the right, original off the car, center 30PG, left ebay set
P8031587.jpg
Box of Raybestos 30PG
I could send the parts back and order another pair from Amazon and save $100 but I bought them in good faith and it would not be right to return them. I’ll just chalk it up as a lesson learned. It pays to do some research rather than just opening a catalog and ordering parts.
Dare to be Different - Buy and Build Packards!
Member:
Packard Automobile Classics
packardclub.org
packardinfo.com
Series 22/23 Packard Group on Facebook

User avatar
Tinman_70
Posts: 818
Joined: Tue May 14, 2013 8:17 am
Location: Tampa Bay, Florida

Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Wed Aug 12, 2015 8:40 am

Finished up the brakes, installed the Amazon shoes on the front and the ebay shoes on the back. Saving the extra pair for my ’39 Ford. Installed the drums, adjusted the brakes and had a friend help me bleed the lines.
P8061591.jpg
Front brake
P8081592.jpg
Rear brake with parking brake attached


Got back to work to finish the exhaust. Made a pattern for the front half of the tailpipe. Took the pattern to Quality Discount Mufflers and Exhaust in St. Petersburg and had them bend a piece of 2” exhaust pipe. Installed the front section.
P8111593.jpg
Used paint stir sticks clamped together to get the basic shape then transferred to cardboard
P8121601.jpg
A hose clamp was used to keep the pipe in correct position in the muffler
Once the front section of the tailpipe was installed, a string was attached to the centerline of the pipe to determine the shape of the rear section. The measurements were taken to locate the center of the loop over the axle. From these measurements, a cardboard pattern was made and taken back to the muffler shop to make the rear section.
P8111594.jpg
A wood plug was inserted into the pipe and string attached at the center line
P8111595.jpg
Patterns that the muffler shop used
The rear piece was attached to the front and checked for fit and clearances. After a small adjustment at the muffler shop, the fit is excellent. The clamps and hangers will be installed once the body is back on the chassis.
P8121603.jpg
The muffler I bought was 2.25" in and out, the shop recommenced using 2" for the tailpipe and made a muffler adapter at no cost
The final cost of the total new exhaust system - $90:
- Header pipe from exhaust manifold – original $0
- Extension from header pipe to muffler – Advance Auto Parts $7
- Muffler – Summit Racing $27
- Custom 2” tailpipe – Quality Muffler $48
- Pipe clamps (2) – Advance Auto $8
Dare to be Different - Buy and Build Packards!
Member:
Packard Automobile Classics
packardclub.org
packardinfo.com
Series 22/23 Packard Group on Facebook

User avatar
Tinman_70
Posts: 818
Joined: Tue May 14, 2013 8:17 am
Location: Tampa Bay, Florida

Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Mon Aug 24, 2015 10:29 am

I’m in the process of cleaning up the radiator support (also referred to as the core support) so that the radiator can be installed and the engine started. There are two rods that hold the support to the side of the frame. There are rubber bushings that mount to the rod where it connects to the frame. They are in bad shape and need to be replaced.
P8241611.jpg
P8241613.jpg
Steele Rubber Products has a set of 4 they sell for $50 retail (#30-0309-31). I love Steele and have bought over $1,000 of their products for the Packard but these rubber bushings look exactly like studded shock absorber bushings. I found the Steele diagram for the bushing and searched the internet for similar shock bushings. I found a Dorman shock bushing (#31018) with almost the same dimensions just slightly smaller in diameter about an 1/8” but with the same thickness and hole size.
Rad Pad.jpg
31018.jpg
The Dorman bushings are about 1.25" in diameter
They are sold at Advance Auto Parts. They are sold in pairs and 2 pair are required. They cost $2.99 per pair. Here is their listing:

http://www.autozone.com/1/products/2206 ... 31018.html

They fit fine and are acceptable as a lower cost replacement. Here is one of the rods with the bushings installed after being cleaned and painted.
P8241614.jpg
P8241616.jpg
Dare to be Different - Buy and Build Packards!
Member:
Packard Automobile Classics
packardclub.org
packardinfo.com
Series 22/23 Packard Group on Facebook

User avatar
Tinman_70
Posts: 818
Joined: Tue May 14, 2013 8:17 am
Location: Tampa Bay, Florida

Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Thu Aug 27, 2015 7:32 am

I'm working on finishing up the radiator support so the radiator can be mounted before starting the engine. The main support was in good condition but caked with undercoating and rust. Some of the side pieces where the fenders attach were badly rusted and needed to be repaired. A small pattern was made for a patch to go over the rusted area. It was transferred to sheet metal, bent to fit and welded in place. The way the pieces attach, welding the patch over the existing metal made a stronger fix than butt-welding and won't affect the way it bolts on.
P8251617.jpg
P8251618.jpg
P8251619.jpg
The main support was cleaned with a pedestal-mounted grinder with a wire brush attached and a wire brush on a 90 degree grinder for the tight spots. The other pieces were media blasted and all were primed and painted. A piece of 1/2" rubber was cut to size to replace the existing mount where the support bolts to the frame.
P8261621.jpg
Dare to be Different - Buy and Build Packards!
Member:
Packard Automobile Classics
packardclub.org
packardinfo.com
Series 22/23 Packard Group on Facebook

Post Reply