1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

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Tinman_70
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Fri Jun 15, 2018 10:35 am

The wiring is all tested and working as far as I can go without starting the engine. Finally got the dome (reading) light working the way I wanted.

Gathered up all the remaining parts for the front end and all the hardware that holds them.
Parts_2.jpg


First was the radiator shroud. After it was installed, reached up under the shroud and attached the front wire harness to the retainers on the back of the shroud.
Parts_3.jpg
Next came the bumper pan. It is attached to the bumper braces and the bottom of the front fender. Rubber bumpers are attached to the pan where pan goes under the front bumper.
Parts_4.jpg
Then came the front bumper. It was lifted over the bumper pan and held in place with the 2 outside bumper bolts. The bumper guards went on next. I'm sure someone at the Packard factory could do this with ease but I had to fumble around trying the get the large attaching bolt and spacer through the bumper and bumper brace and get the nuts attached. Finally got it and added the 5/16" bolts on the top of the guard. The bolts are firmed-up but not tight. When the car is back on the ground, I'll make sure that the bumper is level and tighten all the bolts for both the front and back bumper.
Parts_5.jpg
When I bought the car, both bumpers were in very good condition, they had been re-chromed some time in the past. However, the bumper guards were in poor shape. One was rusted away and the other 3 had a very poor finish up against the bumpers. I purchased one NOS rear bumper guard from Merritt and had the other 3 re-chromed at Custom Plating in Wisconsin. Have about $600 in a very nice set of bumpers. When I win the lottery the first thing I will do is have the grille re-chromed!

The next steps in the project are to add the trunk seal and install the trunk upholstery. Then install the glass in the car.
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Tinman_70
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Tue Jun 19, 2018 8:49 am

I was frustrated trying to get the holes lined up between the air ducts and the front fenders. I decided to change to a less stressful task and work on the trunk upholstery. I've been using a magnetic clamping product called "Mag Daddy" to secure the wires to the chassis and body in hard to reach places rather than using metal clamps. They will stick to any ferrous surface and the ones I used have a holding capacity of 16#. Once positioned, a plastic cable tie is used to hold the wire in place. They also have a clamp with a large plastic base that I'm using to hold the upholstery panel to the underside of the trunk lid rather than Velcro.
Mag daddy.jpg
Better picture of the clamp used to hold wires.
Mag daddy.jpg (15.82 KiB) Viewed 4342 times
MD_1.jpg
Holes in the plastic base allow the clamp to be sewn on to upholstery.
The clamps were positioned to underside of the trunk lid were they would best hold the panel. The upholstery pattern was used to mark the position and the marks were transferred to the panel.
MD_2.jpg
MD_3.jpg
The clamps were secured to the panel using clear Gorilla glue.
MD_4.jpg
Once the glue was set, the panel was securely snapped in place.
MD_5.jpg

Now back to the air ducts!
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Tinman_70
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Sun Jun 24, 2018 8:52 am

Continuing with the trunk, the trunk seal was installed. The seal was from Steele Rubber and was a exact direct fit. Started by cutting a small section and test cut the passenger side corner for the angle fit. The Steele kit includes about 15" of extra material.
Trunk Seal_1.jpg
Installed the seal without the adhesive around the top and bottom of the body. Left the seal long at the upper driver side corner. The corner will be fitted once the seal is almost completely glued in place.
Trunk Seal_2.jpg
Trunk Seal_3.jpg
The painted surfaces were masked-off to keep any adhesive from getting on the paint.
Trunk Seal_4.jpg
The make sure the seal wasn't stretched or contacted as it was glued in place, index marks were placed on both the body and the seal.
Trunk Seal_6.jpg
The adhesive used is Weldwood Gel contact cement rather than the more liquid contact cement, more like a paste that doesn't drip. A small brush was used to apply the cement. The seal was removed and cement carefully applied to the seal channel in the body both around the top and bottom channels. It was allowed to tack-up then starting with the passenger corner, cement was applied to about 12" of the surfaces of the seal where it mates to the body. That portion of the seal was set in place using a plastic stick. This was repeated every 10" to 12" until reaching the drivers corner. About 6" of seal from the corner were left un-glued until the top portion of the seal was in place. The portion of the seal at the top of the trunk was installed in the same manor, starting on the passenger side over to the drivers. The corners of seals were angle cut and fitted then glued in place.
Trunk Seal_5.jpg
The trunk now fits tight and all the gaps line-up. Hopefully, this will keep the trunk from becoming an aquarium like it was before!
Trunk Seal_7.jpg
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Tinman_70
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Tue Jun 26, 2018 8:50 am

Continuing to work on the back of the car, the stainless rear window trim came next. The first problem was replacing the small piece of trim the covers where the trim comes together at the center bottom. That piece was missing. After getting the dimensions from a fellow Packard friend, a replacement was fabricated from 24 gauge stainless steel. It needed rolls at the top and bottom to match the curves of the trim, not easy for such a small piece.
Reae Window_1.jpg
Trim with piece missing.
Reae Window_2.jpg
Replacement piece.
Reae Window_3.jpg
Trim will be hand buffed after it is installed, to flimsy.
Laid the trim out to find the approximate center. This was used to determine the staring point to install the trim over the pinch weld on the window opening.
Rear Window_6.jpg
Used several different measurements to find the approximate center.
Next was to determine the center point of the window opening. Used a string from the center of the cowl back to the center of the trunk handle. Also, measured for the center of the trunk lid. It's important to find the center because once the trim goes over the pinch weld, it's difficult to re-position without removing and trying again.
Rear Window_7.jpg
String wasn't as successful as hoped.
Started the installation by lining up the center marks and pushing the trim over weld. Found I had to hold the trim in place with an expansion clamp so the top corners could pulled down to slide over the weld. The first time I tried without the clamp, the center popped out. Once the center and top corners were set, it was a matter of working the trim around toward the bottom center. A small rubber mallet was used to fully set the trim. Once it was almost in place at the bottom, the small trim piece was slid over both ends and the trim set in place.
Rear Window_8.jpg
Finally totally installed ready for the rear glass.
Rear Window_9.jpg
This is the expansion clamp the was used to hold the trim.
Installing the glass requires a piece of nylon cord and at least 2 or 3 people. I'm waiting for some of my car friends to come by for that task.
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Mon Jul 23, 2018 7:20 am

I've had several posts recently explaining the difficulty I was having installing the rear window glass. It turns out it was my failure to understand how Packard installed the rear glass and headliner. There was a tack strip installed around the inside of the the rear window opening to tack the headliner. The headliner had to be installed before the rear glass because the window gasket seal covered the tack strip. I had not planned to install the headliner before the glass so I didn't install the tack strip. I'm going to secure the headliner by gluing it to the body under the garnish molding. This is how a replacement headliner would be installed without having to remove the rear glass. As it turns out, Packard also used the tack strip as a shim/spacer to hold the glass and gasket in place. Trying to install the glass without the tack strip is almost impossible as I have discovered. To correct this, I installed strips of 5/16" thick by 1/2" wide composite tack strip (Bob Drake TS-45983-A) around the rear window. The original was stapled, I used #4 X 1/2" flathead screws. This should take up the space that allowed the allowed to glass to slip and come out of the gasket. Hopefully, the third attempt will be successful!
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Tue Aug 14, 2018 8:41 am

I had knee surgery several weeks ago so I confined myself to less rigorous Packard tasks.

When I originally added electric fuel pump, it was in the direct line to the mechanical fuel pump. The pump is a 6 volt Carter rotary vane pump with a canister fuel filter ahead of it and a pressure regulator (4#) behind it. I've been told that this type of pump will block the feed to the mechanical pump when it is turned off. I didn't experience this when the engine was broken-in with both the electric pump both on and off. However, I decided to not take chances and go ahead and install a one-way bypass around the electric pump while I was finishing the wiring. The filter/pump/regulator assembly was removed from the chassis to make it easier to work on. I purchased a one-way check valve with 1/4" female threads on each end and 2 6AN "T" fittings from Summit Racing. All the fittings on the assembly were 6AN (3/8") and were adapted to 4AN (5/16") to fit the 5/16" fuel line. The "Ts" were installed before the fuel filter and after the regulator. It was either bypass the fuel filter or rebuild the entire assembly. There is another fuel filter at the carburetor. The pressure regulator is only needed for the electric pump. Adapters were installed in the check valve and 3/8" tubes were bent and flared to connect to the "Ts" bypassing the filter, pump and regulator. The electric pump and bypass line will be tested and re-installed to the chassis.
Fuel_1.jpg
If the bypass was put in originally, the "T" would have been after the filter.
Fuel_2.jpg
Also built a bracket to hold a mechanical oil pressure gauge. Glued a magnet to the bracket and attached it to the firewall. It will be used to verify the operation of the oil pressure gauge on the dash then probably removed.
Oil_1.jpg
Used the magnet to keep from drilling unnecessary holes.
Oli_2.jpg
The next project will be to try to get the rear glass installed for the 3rd time!
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Sat Aug 18, 2018 9:49 am

I’m working on completing the beltline weather strip for the rear windows. The product I’m using is from Restoration Specialties, part #YM3 in a 72” length. Two pieces is enough to do the both back windows of the Club Sedan. The weather strip has a stainless steel bead on the top.

The existing weather strip was in very poor condition. The passenger side was completely rusted away but the driver’s was good enough to use for patterns.
Weatherstrip_1.jpg
Weatherstrip_2.jpg
One caution, as the piece is bent to fit the curves in the garnish molding and body, the stainless bead slides on the strip. Before bending make sure the pieces are longer than necessary then cut to size only after they are bent.
Weatherstrip_3.jpg
A thick cardboard pattern was cut as a pattern from the old weather strip. The 72” piece was cut in half for the 2 inside and outside pieces for the one side with about 3” extra on each end. The weather strip is bent by hand to match the cardboard pattern and the old piece. The passenger side was completely shot but fortunately the sides are symmetrical so I can flip the driver’s inside to outside and use them as the pattern for the passenger side.
Weatherstrip_4.jpg
Once the curves are correct, the excess can be trimmed off. The bead needs to be flattened and bent so that it will slip behind the window glass channel weather strip.
Weatherstrip_5.jpg
The new pieces were test fit on the garnish molding and the body. Originally, the weather strip was stapled to the garnish molding and attached to the body with a small clips. I couldn’t find the correct clips, so the weather strip will be attached with small flathead screws.
Weatherstrip_6.jpg
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Wed Aug 22, 2018 9:54 am

I finished attaching the belt line weather strip to the garnish molding and the body around the rear window. Attached blue tape to the fuzzy side of the molding and flipped it over and drilled the attachment holes from the backside. The tape helps find the holes so they can be drilled for the screws. The strips were clamped in place to the molding and the body and holes drilled for #2 flathead screws. Once the holes were drilled, the weather strip was removed and the tape removed and then re-installed.
Weatherstrip_7.jpg
The tape helps find the holes to be drilled
Weatherstrip_8.jpg
Finished in garnish molding
Weatherstrip_9.jpg
Used tape and foam core board to keep the clamps from damaging the finish
Weatherstrip_10.jpg
Finished on body

I learned a valuable and expensive lesson installing the "U"-shaped glass channel for the rear windows. The channel I bought had stainless steel beads on both sides of the channel. The problem I ran into was the bend in the Club Sedan rear window. It's a sharp 130 degree bend and I could not get the channel to bend that sharply without the stainless bead kinking or separating from the channel. It was $60 worth weather strip wasted. I wound up using un-beaded channel and it works fine. It would not be a problem using beaded channel for the front doors or for all 4 doors.
Weatherstrip_11.jpg
The beaded channel would simply not bend to the shape of the rear window
The unbeaded channel was cut to size and attachments added to both ends to secure it. The channel had a small bead of silicone sealer applied to the top, then placed into the body and secured with 4" clamps.
Weatherstrip_13.jpg
The rear glass channel has clips on each end that slide into slots in the body
Weatherstrip_14.jpg
Clamped in place until sealer sets.

The rear glass and regulator is now ready to install in both sides.
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Fri Aug 24, 2018 11:07 am

Got the driver-side rear window glass installed.

Cleaned the regulator (lifter) and lubed all the contact points on the regulator and lower frame of the glass. There is a channel on the inside of the inner panel that the regulator slides into. It needs to be cleaned and lubed before the regulator is installed. The regulator installs from the hole in the inner side panel. I slid the pivot stud on the regulator into the channel on the inner panel then pushed on the regulator to compress the spring so the 4 bolt holes near the window crank lined up then attached to bolts and the regulator was installed. The regulator was rolled down to its low point to prepare to install the glass. There is a 1/4" bolt on the gear plate that can be removed to allow the regulator to roll lower. This would make it easier to install the washers and retaining clips on the studs that holds the glass frame to the regulator. I didn't think it was necessary so it was left in. The glass slides in from the top and I rested it on the regulator while getting back into the car. Pushed the glass up to make sure it was seated in the weather strip channel. Lowered the glass until the studs on the regulator slid into the slot on the glass frame. The studs on the regulator are spring loaded so you have to press the regulator arm against the glass frame to install the washer and retaining clip. Once both the clips were installed, the glass was rolled up tight to ensure the fit to the weather strip channel. Won't be rolling it down until the garnish molding is installed.
Glass_1.jpg
The rear window regulator, window glass with frame installed and the washers and retaining clips that hold the regulator to the glass.
Glass_2.jpg
Glass installed with nice tight fit all around.

I have installed the front door glass when I replaced the broken passenger window. It seemed to be much easier that installing the rear glass on the Club Sedan. I think that would be true of all the doors on a 4 door car. There is much more room to work with on the doors. I don't think you would have to take the car shop to remove and install the glass. The body manual has the instructions and illustrations on how it is done.

When the sealer sets on the passenger side, I'll finish installing the rear glass then both front door glass.
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Sun Aug 26, 2018 6:55 am

Installing the passenger side rear glass was much easier once you know the tricks. It took about 20 minutes vs almost 2 hours for the other side. The problem with the drivers side was that the channel on the inner panel was bent and the stud kept popping out until I figured it out.

After lubing the contact points, roll the regulator all the way to the top being careful not to roll it off the track. Slide the regulator between the body and the inner panel with the crank stud through the oblong hole in the panel. The 2 lifting arms on the regulator should come through the gap between the body and the inner panel by the weather strip. Reach in between the panels and align the inward facing stud on the regulator with the channel on the inner panel. It is spring-loaded so you need to press it against the channel then push the regulator rearward until the stud slides into the channel. Push down on one of the regulator lifting arms to load the regulator spring. This will move the crank portion of the regulator into the position to attach with 4 retaining bolts. Roll the regulator all the way down and the glass is ready be installed. Drop the glass in from the top. Reach into the inner panel and position the 2 lifter arm studs in the groove in the glass frame. The studs are spring-loaded and need to be pressed by hand to install the washer and retaining clip. Once the washers and clips are installed, roll the glass all the way up and make sure it's firmly in the glass channel.
Glass_3.jpg
Glass_4.jpg
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