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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Posted: Thu Jan 02, 2020 12:16 pm
by Tinman_70
The next obvious step in the AC project was to get the mock-up evaporator/blower unit installed to see what fit. The scrap dash was installed. The larger Compac unit was too long and too wide due to the hood release mechanism on the passenger side. Moving that unit away from the hood release caused it to run into the transmission tunnel and the bottom of the dash. The Mini unit is going to be the one to use even though it might be slightly undersized for the car. It has two mounting points, one in the middle of the front of the unit and and one slightly toward the center of the car on the back. A 90 degree bracket was made for the front mounting point and attached to the bottom lip on the dash. Luckily, the right upper radio mounting bracket lines up with the rear mounting point. A 1" wide 18 gauge metal strap will hold the back of the unit to the radio bracket. A white poster board pattern for the strap is holding the unit in place in the picture. The 2 refrigerant and 2 coolant lines that go through the firewall will also hold the unit solidly in place. When it comes down to having a glove box or AC, it's one or the other. I'll make a shallow glove box to hold a few small items.
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The next major part of the project will be mounting the condenser, dryer and electric fan. Hope this can be done without removing the radiator.

Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Posted: Wed Jan 08, 2020 1:00 pm
by Tinman_70
The gauges and switches are all pre-wired and the mounts to hold the mock-up evaporator/blower are completed. Starting to mount the condenser and cooling fan. The condenser is a Vintage Air Super Flow 17" by 19". I was listed for a 1940 Ford but fits the Packard perfectly. The fan is a Zirco 16" reversible with quiet running curved blades. Due to the placement of the radiator and water pump the fan will be mounted in the front of the radiator. As received it was a "puller" to be mounted to the back of the radiator but it is reversible so the fan was removed and turned around and turned into a "pusher". The 12V polarity checked for pusher operation. The fan was "almost" direct fit to the brackets on the condenser but "almost" wasn't quite good enough so some mounting brackets were made to attach the fan. The only issue I've run into so far is being able to drill the holes for the lower condenser mounting brackets to the car. Hope I don't have to pull the grille!

Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Posted: Sun Jan 12, 2020 8:24 am
by Tinman_70
Finally finished making the brackets to attach the fan to the condenser and the condenser to the body. None of the brackets provided would work so all had to be made. Had to remove the grille support brackets to give clearance for the refrigerant hose connections. Will replace once the hoses are in place. It's just temporarily mounted, will be removed, cleaned and painted before final installation. Extended the fan wiring to reach a 12V fan relay that will be mounted on the left inner fender panel in front of the battery.
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The next step in the project will be to develop a compressor mounting bracket on the upper left side of the engine. The brackets will have to be fabricated using some generic mounting brackets that are made for the Sanden 508 compressor. Mounting the compressor here will require the removal/relocation of the existing oil filter.
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"Make it yourself" compressor brackets.

Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Posted: Mon Jan 13, 2020 11:34 am
by Tinman_70
I bought another batch of Vintage Air AC parts to continue with the project. Got the compressor mounting brackets, the fluid bulkhead where the refrigerant and heater lines will pass through the firewall and the dryer and binary safety switch which will shut down the compressor if low or high pressure occurs. Also in the picture is a scrap Sanden 508 compressor I borrowed from a friend to do the mock-up.
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What I really needed right now were the compressor mounting brackets so I could figure out how the mount the compressor. The plan is to mount it on the left side of the engine and run a single wide groove belt to drive the compressor, alternator and water pump. To accomplish this, the oil filter had to be removed to make room for the compressor. It will be relocated later or simply eliminated. The left horn was also removed to give room to work but will be put back on later. The 2 oil filter mounting holes in the head will serve as the mounting point for the compressor base mounting plate. A poster board pattern was made to test the fit of the mounting plate around the water pump.
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A piece of scrap .060" decking was traced from the poster board pattern. It was strong enough to hold the weight of the compressor but thin enough to put a 90 degree bend where the plate bolts to the cylinder head. It is oversize to begin with and the final mounting plate will be made from 1/4" thick steel and cut to size.
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The mock-up compressor was bench-fit to the brackets to see the best way to attach them. The refrigerant ports are usually placed at the top but can be rotated to the left or right as necessary. The setup in the picture was not the way they needed to be attached, they were reversed.
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The mounting plate was bolted to the cylinder head and the compressor with the brackets attached was put in place. It was obvious that the mount was too high. The brackets were taken off and 2" of material were cut off the bottom.
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After the brackets were cut they were put back on the compressor and it was positioned back on the mounting plate. The full range of adjustment was checked to make sure the compressor pulley and clutch didn't hit anything. It appears that more material can be removed from the mounting brackets to lower the compressor a bit more, but right now I'm at a standstill until I order the new compressor. The compressor I'm using is a double pulley with narrow belts. To get the exact belt alignment, I need to have the new single wide belt compressor. What I did find out was that there needs to be a brace from the bottom of the compressor mounting plate to the rear bolt on the alternator bracket to add strength. Also, it appears that the cooling fan on the water pump is so close to the center-line of the belt, it is likely to hit the clutch on the compressor. There is enough room between the fan and the radiator to space the fan out of the way of the compressor. Now I'm just waiting for FedEx to deliver the new compressor.
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Posted: Mon Jan 13, 2020 2:39 pm
by Howard56
Have you decided if there is room to relocate the filter or are you going to eliminate it. In addition to the photo posted on the pkrdinfo site I have photos of some other Sanden compressors on brackets located over the manifold. A couple of them use a flat plate similar to what you have started and with a combo of bolt locations.

Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Posted: Wed Jan 15, 2020 8:49 am
by Tinman_70
Howard,

I have the photos of Ross' setup mounted on the head studs over the manifolds. Looked like there would be interference with the horn and heater hose outlet on the water pump. My biggest concern with the single wide belt setup is the degrees of belt contact will all the pulleys.

Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Posted: Sat Jan 18, 2020 9:52 am
by Tinman_70
The biggest part of my AC project came in yesterday. The evaporator/blower unit and the single wide groove Sanden compressor. Most of the wiring is plugged and pre-wire which should make it easier to install. I test mounted the compressor to align the pulleys and as I feared, the fan comes in contact with the compressor clutch. I want to keep both the electric and engine driven fans. There is significant room between the fan and the radiator and the shaft on the water pump extends past the fan. It appears that the fan can possibly be spaced away from the water pump to clear the compressor. Still need to order the refrigerant and fittings once the type of fittings are determined, straight, 45 degree, 90 degree, etc.

One of the benefits of being part of the Packard community is getting help and feedback during a project. I've already changed my plans based on some suggestions I've received. It helps to have more than one set of eyes looking at a project. Thanks, Joe
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Also included the AC vent hoses, defrost hoses and drain hose.
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Mounting of the compressor is going to change based on suggestions I received.

Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Posted: Sat Jan 18, 2020 2:44 pm
by Howard56
I wound up needing to make a spacer to fit the bore on the fan and hub on my 356 engine to space the fan out 3/8 inch. Don't know if your hub is the same size but the readily available commercial spacers I could find have too small a bore and extension boss to fit the Packard fan.

Also threw in a photo showing my bracket and how I relocated the filter.

Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Posted: Mon Jan 20, 2020 8:28 am
by Tinman_70
Howard,

Fortunately, I have a scrap water pump I can use as a pattern for a spacer. I thought the fan was centered on the shaft but it is centered a larger diameter of the pulley mount pressed on the shaft. I'm thinking about digging up the old water and pressing off the mount and see if it could be turned into a spacer, otherwise machining one from aluminum. The problem I will face is getting the fan and spacer back on without removing the radiator!

Joe

Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Posted: Tue Jan 21, 2020 12:28 pm
by Tinman_70
Finished mounting the compressor. The brackets on the compressor will be welded to a plate and the plate will be bolted to the mounting bracket attached to the engine. The holes in the bottom plate will be elongated to facilitate fine belt alignment. Right now, everything is tack-welded so a new. longer belt could be sized. To size the belt, an old wide belt from my '39 Ford was cut, some small holes drilled in the ends then a small bungee cord was attached. This rig was put over the pulleys and the cord pulled tight and the gap in the belt measured. Then it was off to NAPA and with the help of the staff, I got a C57 belt (61" total length) that fit just right. All this needs to be pulled apart, finish welded, cleaned up and painted. Before that I'll working on the routing of the refrigerant and heater hoses and their fittings.
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Two mounting plates allow adjustment.
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Used blue Dykem to scribe the exact location of the bracket before welding.
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Tack-welded with new belt installed.
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Used this to get the exact belt size on the first try with help from the NAPA staff pulling belts and finding the exact lengths online. FYI - the # on the belt is not the length.