1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

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Tinman_70
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Fri Jan 24, 2020 7:53 am

Now that the compressor is firmly in place, need to figure out the refrigerant and heater hose routing. There is a bulkhead fitting plate where the hoses pass through the firewall. It's going to be mounted on the plate that covers the hole left when the original heater was removed. A cardboard pattern was made to cover the hole and a plate was made from .120" aluminum. The bulkhead template was attached to cardboard pattern then it was attached to the aluminum plate and the centers of the 4 holes were punched. The 4 holes were drilled using a drill press and a Blair 7/8" "Holcutter".
AC_32.jpg
AC_33.jpg


The 4-hole bulkhead fitting plate was attached to the aluminum cover plate. The high pressure "O" ring fittings attach to the bulkhead plate on both sides. The fittings are the top are the refrigerant lines, #6 from the dryer and #10 from the compressor. The 2 fittings on the bottom are both #10 and connect the 5/8" heater hoses from the engine to the heater core in the evaporator unit.
AC_34.jpg
AC_33A.jpg
Large nuts secure the fitting to the plate.
AC_35.jpg
Looks like the firewall needs some touchup from wrestling the heater out. The plate will be painted black when finished.
I have a bunch of extra fittings and hoses from past AC projects. They will help in mocking-up the routing of the new hoses. The evaporator unit needs to be mounted for the under dash hoses and fittings, for now I'm concentrating on the lines under the hood.
AC_36.jpg
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Tinman_70
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Sat Feb 01, 2020 7:38 am

Finally received the rest of the AC parts that were needed to complete the refrigerant and heater hoses.

The biggest problem I am having with the plumbing of the AC lines is getting the lines from the condenser on the front of the radiator to the compressor and evaporator unit. There is very little room on the sides of the radiator to route the lines. To drill holes for the full size hoses to go through the sheet metal by the fresh air inlets would require removing the fenders. There is some room below where the horns mount to slide a hard line through to the back of the radiator. I bought a set of straight aluminum hard lines with the fittings attached to use for the condenser connections. They will have to be bent to fit. One of the aluminum lines has an OD of 1/2" so I had to buy a larger tubing bender. It was only $45 but is so much better than the Harbor Freight bender I used for the brake and fuel lines. It's made by Imperial and comes with complete instructions on how to get the bends in exactly the right place, something my $10 Harbor Freight bender lacked! The lines will require several precise bends to fit properly.
AC_37.jpg
The heater hose fittings are similar but different from the AC fittings. They use a "beadlock-type" connector that must be crimped like the AC lines. There are adapter fittings in the right side of the picture that adapt the 3/8" female NPT ports in the head and water pump to accept the #10 "O" ring fitting on the heater hoses, no hose clamps are used for a cleaner installation. The 90 degree 5/8" hoses and plastic fittings are used to connect the heater hoses to the evaporator unit under the dash where space is limited.
AC_38.jpg
The next picture is the refrigerant line fittings. They are all "beadlock" and need to be crimped. The connection on the other end of all the fittings is a female "O" fitting. The other type of hose fittings are "barb". They also need to be crimped or clamped. The advantage of beadlock is the you can slide the hose into the fitting and remove it if necessary where with the barb once the hose is slipped into the fitting, it's there for good. The fittings on the left side of the picture are #6. They connect the condenser to the dryer and the dryer to the evaporator. The ones on the right are #8 and #10. The two fittings on the top connect to the compressor and have the service ports attached to them. The #8 hose connects the compressor to the condenser and the #10 connects the evaporator to the compressor.
AC_39.jpg
The next step is the bend the hard lines then size the hoses, install the hoses and have the fittings crimped.
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Tue Feb 04, 2020 10:54 am

My friend and I are both installing Vintage Air systems in our cars, my Packard and his '65 Mustang. We have the hydraulic crimping tool that is used to make-up the beadlock refrigerant hoses. It will crimp #6 to #12 hoses, both refrigerant and heater.
AC_40.jpg
Here's how it works using and old beadlock fitting and a piece of hose.
AC_41.jpg
Select the correct set of dies, this is #6
AC_42.jpg
Open the crimper and install the die set, slide the hose all the way into the fitting.
AC_43.jpg
Center the hose ferrule in the center of the dies.
AC_44.jpg
Pump the handle to complete the crimping process.
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Thu Feb 06, 2020 9:39 am

Working on mocking-up the the under hood AC hoses for length and direction. The condenser is connected with hardlines that had to be bent to fit including a 180 degree corkscrew turn to get it heading in the right direction. I miscalculated the angle of one fitting and had to order a replacement. The heater hoses were connected to the engine using a 3/8" NPT to #10 "O" ring adapter. The dryer was added to the inner fender panel on the right side. The hoses were cut slightly long and will be trimmed and crimped later. Now working on the under dash connections to the evaporator and the heater control valve.
AC_45.jpg
Hardlines were bent to shape.
AC_46.jpg
Hose connections at firewall bulkhead.
AC_47.jpg
Hose connections at the compressor with service ports.
AC_48.jpg
Heater hose connection to head using crimped "O" ring fitting.
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Fri Feb 07, 2020 10:55 am

Just finished fighting to finish the mock-up of the AC and heater hose lines to the evaporator under the dash. There is a heater control valve electric servo that controls the temperature. I tried in vain to mount it behind the dash. There is just not enough room to install it with all the hoses in the area. It didn't help that the passenger side hood release was also in the way. Gave up and mounted the control valve under the hood in the heater line between the cylinder head and the bulkhead hose fitting. All the hoses are mocked-up with the exception of the compressor to the condenser, still waiting for a part. Once all the hoses are done, I'll start crimping.
AC_49A.jpg
Hard to see but this was the attempt to mount the heater valve directly to the evaporator, no room.
AC_49.jpg
With the valve removed, this is the final mock-up of the under dash AC and heater hoses.
AC_50.jpg
Heater control valve installed in the hose from the head to the bulkhead.
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Sun Feb 09, 2020 7:45 am

After all the under dash hoses were make-up, the old dash was re-installed and the evaporator mounted with the permanent brackets to make sure everything fit correctly.
AC_51.jpg
When crimping the hoses with any angled fittings, you have to make sure the ends are properly oriented. Once crimped, the ends can not be re-positioned. When installed they were marked and removed then crimped.
AC_52.jpg
AC_53.jpg
All the hoses were removed and crimped.
AC_54.jpg
The evaporator, compressor and condenser re-capped to prevent moisture getting while the system is dis-assembled. The compressor needs to be removed and the mounting bracket needs to have the welding finished, then cleaned and painted. Then the system can be re-installed, vacuumed and charged.
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Tue Feb 11, 2020 8:25 am

Pulled off the AC compressor mounting brackets and finished the welding. Added a brace to the bottom bracket for added strength. Got the pieces media blasted and primed ready for some black paint. My MIG welding skills have been described as effective, the parts will stick together, but not always pretty!
AC_55.jpg
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Thu Feb 13, 2020 12:02 pm

All the different pieces for the AC components were cleaned and primed. The mounting pieces for the fan and condenser were tagged to make sure the installed in the right place.
AC_56.jpg
Everything was pained with gloss black paint.
AC_57.jpg
The bulkhead fittings were attached to the mounting plate and it was attached to the firewall.
AC_58.jpg
The compressor mounting brackets installed and the compressor attached. The fan belt was installed and tensioned.
AC_59.jpg
The fan and condenser assembly was re-assembled with the painted mounting brackets.
AC_60.jpg
Next up is to install the condenser and the AC and header hoses.
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Wed Feb 19, 2020 1:26 pm

Continuing to work on the AC and also started back on the 12V conversion.

Installed the condenser and electric fan assembly in the front of the radiator. Installed the AC hardlines to the condenser. All the other AC and heater lines are made but I'm going to hold off connecting them until the under hood re-wiring is completed. A 12 volt 30 amp cube relay for the fan was attached to the fender panel on the left side. It was wired to the fan and powered by the wire formerly used by the heater blower. The operation of the fan was tested and the works properly when the relay is activated.
AC_61.jpg
A 12 volt original-style horn relay replaced the 6 volt relay in the same position. The horns were re-installed and tested and on 12 volts are quite loud. A high-watt resister load will be added to the horn circuit to the bring down the voltage so they will survive on 12 volts.

The charging circuit was modified by replacing the 6 volt positive ground 60 amp alternator with a 100 amp GM negative ground alternator. This should be sufficient for the AC add.

The ignition was upgraded to 12 volts using a Pertronix electronic ignition module. The original distributor already had the Pertronix 6 volt positive ground system with a 6 volt Flame Thrower coil. The change only required removing the 6 volt module and replacing it with 12 volt unit. The coil was changed to a 12 volt, 1.5 ohn Flame Thrower and the wiring was switched to have a negative ground. I put about 1,000 miles on the car last year and had not problem with the Pertronix ignition. Other people have not been so lucky. All I can say is that with good wiring and good charging system, it works great.
12V_14.jpg
Next up are the oil and temp senders for the new gauge set and the relay/12 volt to 6 volt converter for the R11 overdrive.
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Fri Feb 21, 2020 11:44 am

For a change of pace, all the exterior bulbs were changed to 12 volt. The headlights were replaced with Sylvania XTRAVision halogen. The parking lights are Bosch 1157A amber bulbs. The amber bulbs are more noticeable than white and the look better. The taillights are 1157HP. They are 50/14 candle power and are very bright through the glass lens. The license plate light cross-referenced to a #67. All the lights were tested in-place and all worked properly.

Back to the under hood rewiring, the 6 volt starter solenoid was replaced with a 12 volt unit. The 6 volt solenoid worked on 12 volts when starting the tight rebuilt engine. the question was how long it would work on 12 volts so it was changed.
12V_16.jpg
Starter solenoids look the same, 6V on the right.

When the car was running on 6 volts, the original overdrive relay failed. Rather than replace it with an original-type reproduction with the glass tube fuse, an overdrive relay from Vintage Auto Garage was used to replace it. It used a circuit breaker rather than a fuse and worked flawlessly with the R11 OD. It has to be replaced for the 12 volt conversion so a replacement from VAG is also being used. It serves as the overdrive relay with a circuit breaker and also converts 12 volts to 6 volts so the original 6 volt OD solenoid can be used. 12 volt solenoids for R11 ODs are very expensive plus I have a couple of spare 6 volt units so this was the best solution.
12V_17.jpg
The 6V relay is at the bottom and the 12V relay/voltage converter is at the top.
The oil pressure and temperature senders for the new gauges replaced the originals. That wraps up all the the under hood wiring. Just need to clean up the harnesses and it will be on to the dash and AC wiring.
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