1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

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Tinman_70
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Wed Jul 15, 2020 6:45 am

I had to remove the steering wheel to be able to work on the dash re-wiring. When I took it apart, I put all the many parts in a plastic bag and put it aside. I've put this back together several times, but it never fails that I have to stare at all the parts to try to figure out how it goes back together. Might even have to check a diagram Howard sent me a long time ago! It came back to me and I got all the insulators and the disk on the horn wire in the right place and the horn ring assembled.
12V_55.jpg


The biggest trick in re-assembly is getting the horn wire all the way down the steering shaft and out at the bottom of the steering box. Trying to push the wire down the shaft is like trying to push a snake up hill by the tail. The opening in the shaft narrows at the steering box and it seems no matter how hard you try, the horn wire will not go past that point. I've found that the easiest way to get the wire installed is to run something from the bottom up to and out of the steering wheel. I used a piece of safety wire, the stuff that is used to secure critical nuts and bolts from coming loose. It is very thin and very strong. It slides right up the column. Attached a piece of nylon cord to the wire and pulled the cord down the shaft. Attached the end of the horn wire to the cord and pulled the cord and wire down the shaft and out the steering box. There is no connector on the end of the horn wire, it was removed before disassembly. A new connector will be added to connect to the horn relay wire. The last 6 inches of the assembly gets tricky as the horn ring spring needs to be lined up with the horn ring and the steering wheel as the last part of the cable is pulled, easier with 2 people. The 3 screws then attach the ring plate to the steering wheel and the plastic cover is attached. There needs to be something between the steering wheel and the plastic cover, I used a piece of 1 1/2" thick foam cut in a 3" circle. What Packard originally used had turned into a glob of goop!
12V_54.jpg
12V_57.jpg
12V_56.jpg


Now need to install the interior windshield trim and the front seat and the car will be ready to drive.
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Tinman_70
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Wed Jul 15, 2020 10:37 am

Howard,

Because I have learned never to doubt you, I pulled it back apart to check the ground contacts. The diagram is not real clear. I swear that's how I assembled it before and I had a working horn!

Joe
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Tinman_70
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Thu Jul 16, 2020 9:56 am

As usual, Howard's sharp eye caught how my horn switch had been haywired. I didn't know the difference from someone's earlier handiwork. Will be corrected!
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Sat Aug 01, 2020 9:21 am

Took the Packard out early this week with 95 degree heat and the AC on full blast. Ran fine, didn't overheat but ran warmer than I would like, about 200 (new gauge has numbers). Decided to go with Plan B, adding the mechanical fan back on the water pump. The problem was that with the single belt arrangement with the compressor on the left, the fan in the original position hit the clutch of the compressor. I had planned to build a spacer, if necessary, to move the fan toward the radiator about 7/16". On most cars this would be pretty simple, drill 4 holes in a spacer and bolt it on. Not so with Packard, it has a lip on water pump bracket that centers the fan. This makes a spacer much more difficult to build.

I started by buying a $6 piece of 5/8" thick aluminum billet. First used a hole saw with the correct inside diameter to cut the relief that will center the fan on the front of the adapter. Then used another hole saw to cut into the back of the spacer for the hole to center the back of the spacer on the water pump. Then used a 2 3/4" hole saw to get the round 2 1/2" round disk. Used a drill press for this.I have a small lathe but it is not powerful enough the carve out the excess material to finish the spacer. I used a 1/2" end mill in a drill press with a clamp to carve out the excess material. Not as pretty as using a lathe but equally effective. Drilled the 4 mounting holes and it is ready to mount. Would have been much easier with a lathe, but still possible with some available tools!

AC-81A.jpg
Marked the area of the plate where the spacer will be cut.
AC-82.jpg
Used a Blair hole saw in a drill press to cut the place where the fan blade will be centered. Depth of cut was checked. The material outside will be cut away.
AC-83.jpg
The cut for the part of the spacer that slips over the water pump was made at the proper depth using another hole saw. The material inside the cut will be removed.
AC-84.jpg
This is the front of the spacer where the fan is bolted on and centered.
AC-85.jpg
This is the back of the spacer with the material removed so it slips over the end of the water pump.
AC-86.jpg
Test fit the spacer between the fan and a scrap water pump.



Now that the spacer is done, the real hard part will be trying to mount the assembly with everything in close quarters!
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Thu Aug 06, 2020 7:05 am

To paraphrase the Sopranos "Just when you think your project is complete, something pulls you back in!". I was out with one of my final test drives, everything was good until I pulled up to my shop gate, shut the car off to open the gate and when I went to re-start, nothing happened.

I dragged the car back into the shop and checked the battery, the voltage was good and I had no trouble starting the car earlier that morning several times so I immediately blamed the Chinese 12 volt solenoid that has previously given me trouble. Went to NAPA and bought a Ford 12 volt solenoid, pulled the starter and modified the solenoid to fit. Bench-tested the starter and re-installed. Ouch! Still no start! All indications are that there was a sudden failure of one or both of the 6 volt Optima batteries. I'm kicking myself for not having by jumper box charged before deciding to remove the starter! I had not way of load testing the batteries and they are a real chore to remove to be tested. So I grabbed a 20% off coupon and headed to Harbor Freight to buy a 100 amp battery load tester. Total cost, $16 plus tax. Tested the batteries in the car at 12V and sure enough there was a problem. Removed the batteries and tested each at 6V and one was totally dead and the other was marginal. One was bought in 2015 and the other in 2016. Ordered a new pair of 5 volt Optimas for $375 and waiting for them to be delivered. Lesson learned, don't jump to conclusions, check all options first and suspect the less obvious!
12V_60.jpg
NAPA Ford 3-poll Solenoid added.
12V_61.jpg
Bench test new starter setup.
12V_63.jpg
Harbor Freight load tester connected to bad battery.
As a side note, the easiest way to reinstall the starter from the top is to remove the head from a 7/16" course bolt and screw it by hand into the top starter bolt hole. Slide the starter on to the bold, wedge level if necessary and install the bottom bolt firm but not tight. Remove the headless bolt and install the top bolt. Secure both. I cut a slot in the temporary bolt in case it can't be removed by fingers.
12V_62.jpg
Headless 7/16 course bolt for starter replacement.
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Tue Aug 18, 2020 9:06 am

Got the battery and starter situation resolved. The Ford starter solenoid threw me a curve. Unlike the original solenoid, it is activated by a ground from the starter switch rather than positive voltage. Once I figured that out and made a minor wiring change, the car starts fine.

Corrected the horn issue that Howard pointed out. The problem started when someone in the past removed the steering wheel with a sledge hammer rather than a puller. The result was that the steering shaft was bent and the threads were messed up so the steering wheel would not go on as far as it should. Fixed the threads with a special 3/4" X 20 UNEF thread chaser but the steering wheel only went on slightly further due to the bent shaft. Used a shim on the contact disk to make up the distance and now the horn works perfectly.

The fan spacer that I made previously was installed on the water pump pulley. With the fan moved forward there were very tight quarters to install the 4 bolts that attach the fan and spacer assembly. The bolts are fine thread and could only be turned about a 1/4 turn at a time with a box or open end wrench! Took quite a while to get them all secure. The fan now clears the AC clutch and is still almost an inch from the radiator. It will supplement the cooling from the electric fan that is is the front of the radiator and condenser.

Took the car out for a ride this morning in 90 degree heat and the temperature stayed pegged at 180 degrees. A potential problem avoided.

Just about time to bring this 7 year project to a close.
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Mon Oct 05, 2020 6:58 am

My '49 Packard Club Sedan project is finally completed after 6 plus years. It was not a "restoration" but more of a "rebuild". Tried to keep it as original as possible but unless you can find a car like this that has been well cared for over its 70 years it is practically and economically impossible. My car was heading to be stripped and crushed when reality set in for the former owner. I loved the design and couldn't pass up buying it. I was able to do virtually all the work myself which kept the rebuild cost within reason and I had a lot of time to work on it. My work may upset some purists, but I did the best I could to get this car back on the road for people to enjoy seeing a Packard rather than the numerous everyday Fords and Chevys.

I've taken probably over a thousand pictures of the build process and posted many of them on this forum over 6 years. After having some idle time, I was able to sort through all the pictures and consolidate some to show the build from start to finish. I tried to keep it to no more than 100 but wound up with a few more. Each picture has a caption to explain the picture. I tried to find a simple way to present the story and decided to create an album on Flickr. I most admit I'm better at working on car than with websites, so I hope the attached link works.

I would like to thank the members of the Packard Club forum for the help and encouragement they have given me over the years. It made the project much easier. I'm keeping my eye open for another project but maybe not quite so extensive!

Joe Wareham - Tinman_70

https://www.flickr.com/gp/hotrods_23/9pzt05
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Dave Czirr » Mon Oct 05, 2020 9:45 am

Congratulations Joe on finishing your project! I've enjoyed every minute and step of your journey and wish you many happy hours and miles in your Packard.

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Ozstatman
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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Ozstatman » Mon Oct 05, 2020 1:05 pm

Joe,

My congratulations as well. I've enjoyed following along from afar as you've returned your Packard to "better than new" condition. Well done!
Mal
Currently - '50 Packard Eight Touring Sedan
Previously - '41 120 Club Coupe(Sold October 2017) & '38 Eight Touring Sedan(Sold July 2009)
Bowral, Southern Highlands, NSW Australia

"Out of chaos comes order" - Nietzsche.

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Re: 1949 Packard 8 Club Sedan

Post by Tinman_70 » Fri Oct 09, 2020 9:32 am

I guess when you have an old car, the work is never done. Was going for a ride and noticed that the left front turn signal was not operating. Rear signal was working fine. Traced it back to the turn signal switch and cable. This requires removing the steering wheel and to do that requires removing the horn wire again! I solved that problem by pulling on the horn wire, cutting the wire a couple inches from the disk and adding a small single wire Moldex connector, won't have to fish the horn wire any more! Removed the steering wheel and the turn signal switch. It was not in great shape. The insulators are a bit warped. I cleaned it up carefully and bench tested it. It seemed to work OK. It was re-installed in the steering column and now works intermittently if you wiggle the arm. I put everything back together so I can drive the car but definitely need to replace the switch. Found an NOS replacement at Tucson Packards and will pull it all apart again and fix it.
Turn Signal_2.jpg
This is the connector used to split the horn wire. IT snaps firmly together and fits inside steering shaft with clearance to move.
Turn Signal.jpg
Connector installed close to disk.
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