UK - Based 1941 110 Touring Sedan Deluxe RHD

If you're starting a project, large or small, please share your progress with us in pictures and words.
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Adam
Posts: 1078
Joined: Fri Sep 04, 2009 4:15 am
Location: lincolnshire, uk

Re: UK - Based 1941 110 Touring Sedan Deluxe RHD

Post by Adam » Tue Jun 24, 2014 4:57 am

Excellent work Howard, I am impressed.

Thanks for sharing the insight.

Adam..
"Do not underestimate the English cousin.....they are not as stupid as they look!" - Signor Altabani in The Italian Job.

analyse999
Posts: 208
Joined: Wed Jan 01, 2014 9:02 am
Location: Yorkshire, England (UK)

Re: UK - Based 1941 110 Touring Sedan Deluxe RHD

Post by analyse999 » Sat Jul 05, 2014 3:56 am

Thanks Adam; I realise my car is a bit of a 'niche item' and maybe not the most valuable or prestigious, but I love it to bits. I also think there's real value in a project blog for the owners themselves, not just in the advice and support from fellow enthusiasts which in itself is brilliant, but also to enable you to look back as an owner at where you've come from and the different stages, which can be hard to recall once its behind you. I also subscribe to the idea that we are all just custodians of these treasures, so its nice to think we are not just maintaining and preserving them, but also creating a record of their life for others to use both now and in the future - I would love to have access to the history of my car before it came to stay with me, which if there had been clubs, forums and 'project blogs' then, might have been possible.

Progress-wise, I've a little more to report. Firstly the front fender guard accessory kindly sourced for me by Flackmaster (for which a big thankyou to David) came back from the platers yesterday and so was dully prepped and fitted. I love it, and think it really sets off the front of the car, but have to say that whilst the plating is excellent, it really emphasises just how much the final result also depends on the quality and preparation of the original parts; in this case thanks to David I was very lucky and the used parts were top notch.


A FEW CHROMING TIPS

Another point to note; plating never manages to cover everything; inside hollow parts, corners, spots where wires were run, all these represent areas of lesser or no plating that lie next to good chrome, so put the piece at risk from fresh corrosion. In the 'hidden' areas, my own solution is to paint these areas with a rust inhibitor PAINT, and then with a silver or chrome paint topcoat, before liberally lubricating everything including the chrome. Tip; NEVER use a chemical rust inhibitor or 'rust killer' on these areas unless you are sure it is acid free- most have an acid content that will 'eat' not only rust but penetrate new chrome too -you might not realise this at the time of application when it can polish off the surface, but if penetration occurs, it will come through eventually, showing as rust through your lovely chrome. For hollow areas, remembering the chroming involves liquids and water dipping at several stages, I always rinse thoroughly, blast as much liquid as possible out with an airline, dry over several days, then inject the cavities with a liquid rust inhibitor/wax (e.g. Waxoyl) I also lubricate hidden areas with Petroleum Jelly (e.g. the folded rims of lamp bezels). Where sometimes the external chrome is present but this (e.g. if a part has been wire-hung during plating), these can be given some protraction with a tiny application of clear nail varnish.

DASH GRAINING

Separately, my Dash graining Kit has landed in the UK. Shipping regulations meant the aerosol base coat could not be shipped, so I'm seeking a local (UK) solution. Paint factors here all seem to require the paint code (modern car) rather than matching to as sample; I do have a DuPont code for the sample, but can't find a UK Dupont Paint supplier. Has anyone any suggestions ?


And finally, just when you thought you were all alone.... So far I've found there are relatively few Packards here in the UK; -last night I went to a local once-a year charity vehicle show in my home town, a very local, low key thing. Imagine my surprise to find two Packards, both in excellent restored condition, one even being Right Hand Drive, both owned by the same chap, living about 4 miles from me. Similarly he didn't know of me; in conversation, he said he'd heard a white Packard had been seen at a house in Wakefield, but didn't believe it... (its mine) -small world, and proof that another of the many qualities of Yorkshiremen is their superior taste in automobiles...
Attachments
IMG_9304 small.jpg
Front Fender Guard Accessory
Last edited by analyse999 on Thu Aug 28, 2014 12:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Packards42
Posts: 31
Joined: Wed Sep 09, 2009 1:03 pm

Re: UK - Based 1941 110 Touring Sedan Deluxe RHD

Post by Packards42 » Thu Jul 10, 2014 4:58 pm

Defineately I would keep the 12 volt, and most get autolight or Delco regulator setup. From my TR6 day Lucas stuff was not to dependable. Export model had a lot of customizing. a 41 that a rare bird considering Briton was at War then.

Packards42
Posts: 31
Joined: Wed Sep 09, 2009 1:03 pm

Re: UK - Based 1941 110 Touring Sedan Deluxe RHD

Post by Packards42 » Thu Jul 10, 2014 5:01 pm

DO I count with a Yorshire Wife. I gale the tailight worked out for you.

analyse999
Posts: 208
Joined: Wed Jan 01, 2014 9:02 am
Location: Yorkshire, England (UK)

Re: UK - Based 1941 110 Touring Sedan Deluxe RHD

Post by analyse999 » Sun Jul 13, 2014 12:49 pm

Good advice the. the electrics, thankyou. I'm intending to retain 12volt for now but use a voltage reducer to provide a 6-volt feed to the instruments - more on this as I progress with the dash rebuild and rewire.

And regarding a 'Yorkshire wife', with your choice in ladies and in cars, sir you are doubly blessed (just don't tell; my wife - she's Irish...) :0)

analyse999
Posts: 208
Joined: Wed Jan 01, 2014 9:02 am
Location: Yorkshire, England (UK)

Re: UK - Based 1941 110 Touring Sedan Deluxe RHD

Post by analyse999 » Tue Aug 12, 2014 3:16 am

DASH WOODGRAINING

I've had the various parts to start my dash rebuild to hand for a while now, just not the courage to make a start, the first and scariest task being the Woodgraining...

The more observant of you may have noticed my garage is a little 'packed' - it suffers from me being an inveterate collator (OK, compulsive hoarder), of the sort of automotive gold that my wife describes as 'a load of old tat'. The downside of that is that I have no clear bench space available for anything -let alone the dash. My beloved having decided at short notice to visit her mother in Ireland for a couple of days provided the ideal opportunity to take over the house kitchen for the woodgraining - what better 'bench' than yards of granite composite and solid oak furniture that would grace the set of Dallas -nothing but the best for my 'number two lady' (my Packard) !

The deluxe 'Grain-it' Technologies kit (thanks Evan) had to be sent without the spray base coat due to shipping regulations, so in advance after carefully tapping out and filling a few dents in the dash metal (any imperfection would obviously show in the final finish), followed by epoxy coating and then sanding the whole thing, it received a coat of plastic primer followed by several coats of the base colour I had mixed locally as a visible match to the sample provided.

Careful research (OK watching the DVD provided, coupled with lots of 'Youtube' clips of people doing woodgraining -useful extra help) explained how the Woodgraining process involves a series of 5 separate stages, namely; base coat; woodgraining; toning; sealing and lacquering.

The 'Grain-it' videos made the graining stage look easy -its not ! To be fair, my dash had lots of curved surfaces and internal radiuses, I had opted for a 'butt' (burr) walnut finish, which is a complex grain pattern that 'fans out' from the centre of the dash, and I also wanted to grain the inside of the dash where the glovebox shut, not the easiest example for a beginner, but it took an eternity. The key for me was to imagine the dash as a series of (almost) flat surfaces, break those down into pieces, and then grain each piece separately, trying wherever possible to follow or match the flow of the grain. Patience was the key here - for me it was a big step to realise that you are not 'painting' the dash, but actually laying a print onto it with a flexible roller -that means one application in a smooth single process and no going back over a section -this just turns the grain into a dull 'coat of paint' and much thicker/darker than the rest. The use of sandpaper and magnets to mask and merge different sections did work pretty well, but took a lot of practice and many retries. Finally all four pieces were done -after 6 hours (no kidding). These were left to dry before applying the 'toner' compound.

The kit emphasises the need to use the right base paint to ensure the grain ink dries/adheres properly -not an option for me here in the UK. It also recommends a brand of paper towel to apply the toner -again not an option. The process to apply the toner onto the grain is essentially very gentle rubbing of the toner across the grain, followed by wiping off excess with a clean towel. In my case, this lifted the grain in key areas of the dash and glove box lid - catastrophe ! The solution I adopted was to mask off and then clean those areas back to base coat using turpentine and then washing; this removed the damaged grain without affecting the base coat. I then regrained the damaged areas and to be absolutely honest they came out better than before (practice I guess).

The next step was to 'seal' the toner before applying lacquer -again Grain-it would normally supply this as a rattle-can but in my case I had to find a suitable alternative ('Adhesion Aid'). After a dusting of that, and drying, the final stage was several coats of lacquer, which is where I'm at now (see pics).

Now, purists may say that the '41 110 had a 'Cuban Mahogany' finish (true), but in my defence, I couldn't match that with a kit, so the walnut is a close second (and was the standard for the '41 120 I believe). The finish I suspect is also darker than standard as a result of the non-standard base coat (if only DuPont sold paint in the UK !). When I first bought by car the dash was painted in what looked like red oxide (put on with a yard brush), so anything is an improvement, and as my car was an export model in Ivory, the darker dash is a nice contrast to the paint, and also to the all new dash plastic in Beige thats waiting to go on. Once the graining/lacquering is finished, the dash rebuild proper will start.

In conclusion, the Woodgraining kit was an excellent buy -reasonably priced and from a very helpful and knowledgeable supplier, and I would certainly recommend it, and them. I have to be honest though, whilst I'm sure it gets easier with practice, most 'one car' owners like myself may not get that much practice, so if I was based in the US, I'd probably entrust this to the professionals -the dash is the 'internal 'eye candy' for the car, and a properly grained dash is a beautiful thing.

All I now have to do is remove all traces of having used the kitchen for forbidden purposes (cars) before my wife gets home - after a thirty-year career as a Detective, you would think I knew a thing or two about hiding my tracks, but that is as nothing to my wife's powers of investigation, so fingers crossed; if this is my last Forum post, that will be because she found out, and I'll probably be found buried under the cellar floor ...

Best Regards,

Howard.
Attachments
Primer.jpg
Dash in Base Coat
IMG_1679.jpg
Dash half-grained
IMG_1680.jpg
Grain close-up (inner curves)
IMG_1681.jpg
Toned, sealed, first clear coat
IMG_1683.jpg
Another aspect at first-clear stage -dark but subtle

analyse999
Posts: 208
Joined: Wed Jan 01, 2014 9:02 am
Location: Yorkshire, England (UK)

Re: UK - Based 1941 110 Touring Sedan Deluxe RHD

Post by analyse999 » Wed Aug 27, 2014 1:25 am

Heater Fitting

As part of preparing the firewall/under-dash area to fit the new dash, I wanted to fit a genuine heater/demister and a windscreen washer, so preparation for that was the next task. A while back I acquired a genuine Packard heater/Demister, and a period Trico washer, so the task was to best position them to the car and then prepare everything so they could be bolted straight on in due course.

After getting some good thoughts on the heater mounting through the Forum, in the absence of any clear 'factory' guidance, or other factory indications on the firewall (pre-cut holes,or indentations) that I understand some models did have, I reverted to trying to find the best place functionally from the point of view of operation/air circulation, and without interfering with other components inside the car and in the engine bays, OR with front seat occupants.

Dealing with the heater/demister first, my solution was to trial-fit the radio, wiper motor and glove box (the engine compartment components were already in place), and then 'play around' positioning the heater for a best fit. Anywhere in the passenger footwell interfered with space for feet for the passengers, and was beyond the reach of the driver, but eventually I found a good fit for the heater (and top-mounted demister) precisely in the centre-line of the dash, where the heater sat far enough back under the dash and radio to be accessible, doors opened OK, etc. As part of the process I also noticed that the firewall recess for the engine is not exactly central to the car, an interesting feature.

After careful checking and measuring ('check twice, cut once'), I drilled the two mounting bolt screws and then drilled/filed out the two water pipe holes to a size big enough to take the pipes plus a proper grommet to guard against noise etc. and pipe damage from rubbing. The exit point into the engine bay gives good clearance at the back of the engine to pipe up the water inlet/outlet, so I'm now just repainting the firewall and under the dash prior to dash assembly. (I also took the opportunity to weld up a few 'extra' screw holes that 70 years of previous owners had made, and to fit a period windscreen washer in the engine compartment).

I wont pipe up the heater yet as I still have to fit the second auxiliary water heater that sits under the front seat and feeds the rear passengers, and then pipe up the two together, but I'm pleased with the dash heater fitting. All I need now is the proper (rectangular, 3-door) heater : I hope that has the same dimensions otherwise there will be more 'tweaking' to do ...

The washer bottle came next; this mounts inside the engine compartment on the firewall, with the removable glass bottle sitting in a metal carrier. The mount as I bought it had the brackets angled so that they mounted the bottle at an angle to the firewall; that was no good for my car, so my first job was to modify the brackets by beating them flat and then rebending/cutting/drilling so that the bracket the mounted at 90 degrees to the firewall.

My car being RHD, the steering column is on the 'other' side to the wiring components mounted on the firewall; that gave me a nice space on the firewall that cleared the regulator etc without fouling other parts like the engine, horns, ignition coil. Four quick holes drilled through the bulkhead, and one trial fitting later, all looks good, so the components are now being reconditioned whilst I prep/repaint the firewall and under the dash. Progress !
Attachments
IMG_9773.jpg
Heater trial-fitted under dash
IMG_9776.jpg
Heater sits well back, clearing other dash components
IMG_9761.jpg
Washer bottle bracket
IMG_9762.jpg
Washer Bottle trial fitting
1942-packard-180-heater.jpg
The heater on my 'wants' list -anyone got one going spare ?

Adam
Posts: 1078
Joined: Fri Sep 04, 2009 4:15 am
Location: lincolnshire, uk

Re: UK - Based 1941 110 Touring Sedan Deluxe RHD

Post by Adam » Wed Aug 27, 2014 4:13 am

Nice work Howard. I do like the woodgraining. The car is really taking shape now.


Adam..
"Do not underestimate the English cousin.....they are not as stupid as they look!" - Signor Altabani in The Italian Job.

analyse999
Posts: 208
Joined: Wed Jan 01, 2014 9:02 am
Location: Yorkshire, England (UK)

Re: UK - Based 1941 110 Touring Sedan Deluxe RHD

Post by analyse999 » Thu Aug 28, 2014 11:56 am

Seek and ye shall find

Thanks Adam; I hope so !

Work on the dash continues apace, and as always the devil and the quality is in the preparation. I've been preparing under the bulkhead to apply sound deadening, and checking the wiper arm mechanisms, and found an interesting feature. My car has no cowl vent; as can be seen from earlier pictures, the panel is just flat and painted, continuous from the screen surround to the bonnet rear edges. Ive not stripped the paint in that area back to bare metal so don't know if its a solid panel, pr has been filled/leaded, either at the factory or subsequently; I've seen other (LHD) '41 110' Sedan's with cowl vents, but just thought that was a variable/optional feature of the car as one of the relatively inexpensive Packards of its day.

However, whilst laid under the dash, I found all the interior fittings and mouldings for the cowl vent (see picture) in place where they should be; as well as the pressings in the outer skin, most of the various inner mouldings a, mesh, drain tube, etc, all appear to be in place.

So; my question is; does anyone know if the cars were sold without cowl vents, and if so, why might mine have most of the rest of the parts fitted ? Needless to say I don't want to have to strip the cowl paint unless necessary, but a cowl vent would obviously be a big bonus for passive ventilation, so I am interested to explore the feasibility of retro-fitting or reinstating a cowl vent. Thats assuming its possible, and I can get the other parts... (vent outer plate, operating arm, etc.)

On a separate note, my brake master cylinder was corroded beyond redemption, so a remanufactured part was ordered from one of the clubs main suppliers, and duly arrived. The unit was the correct part for the LHD 41 110, but is different to the unit fitted to my car. The one on my car is US-made, and fits the mounting bracket perfectly, so I don't think its a later 'bodge' replacement. Mechanically the two have the same operating features, but the mounting hole spaces differ by almost a centimetre, and the body castings are totally different (mine looks like a unit from a later model). Its not an issue, just interesting; (and if anyone wants a genuine 41 110 cylinder, I now have a spare).

And finally, in fitting an original radio aerial, I thought the mast-radio wire had been cut out as the aerial on the car when I bought it was non-standard and there was only the bottom end of the wire showing under the dash. Imagine my surprise when I pulled it out to find it was complete, it had just fallen down behind the header inner panel. After a quick refurb it was refitted by threading from the aerial down behind the headlining and door post. O happy day ! - All I need now is a radio...
Attachments
IMG_9799.jpg
Cowl Vent parts under dash
IMG_9802.jpg
Original Aerial wire
IMG_9803.jpg
The business end of the aerial wire
IMG_9814.jpg
Top to bottom - Original part : Replacement part : Genuine RHD 41 110 part
Last edited by analyse999 on Thu Aug 28, 2014 3:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Dave Czirr
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Re: UK - Based 1941 110 Touring Sedan Deluxe RHD

Post by Dave Czirr » Thu Aug 28, 2014 1:06 pm

That's really interesting about the cowl vent, in fact I'm flabbergasted. It's not something I would ordinary take notice of, but I would have assumed that all the 41 Packards had them. Rather than a feature particular to the 110, I wonder if it was somehow (and I don't see why) related to a RHD car? Our friend Mal from Oz visits here often and has seen a lot of RHD Packards, maybe he'll have a clue.

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