1940 120 Convertible Coupe Restoration

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theastronaut
Posts: 93
Joined: Wed Sep 10, 2014 9:04 am
Location: Anderson SC

Re: 1940 120 Convertible Coupe Restoration

Post by theastronaut » Thu May 14, 2015 12:25 pm

Got most of the lead work done, ran out of lead sticks before I was able to finish the last rear quarter/trunk panel seam.

I melted out the last two spots I had left on for reference and blasted the areas to clean out the rust that was underneath. The top pic shows just how far the edge was pounded in from the factory.

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Filled in the driver side quarter seam. I'll have to remove the bracing before I can file it smooth.

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Door jambs filled and smoothed.

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Shot the body with a couple coats of PPG DP74LF epoxy. I'll get it back on the frame next and start welding in the new panels.

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theastronaut
Posts: 93
Joined: Wed Sep 10, 2014 9:04 am
Location: Anderson SC

Re: 1940 120 Convertible Coupe Restoration

Post by theastronaut » Tue Jun 16, 2015 3:38 am

I cut the jump-seat base out and made a new panel. This was an easy piece to make... the rest of the rear seat area kicked my butt... :dohh:

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Like the middle pans, the only thing I had to go by for the rear pans were the pictures and measurments taken earlier from another car. I made a (really) rough draft of a template to start mapping out the bead lines and body mount areas. The pictures I had were barely adequate to get the measurements correct, so there were a couple areas that all I could do was make the proportions look right. I doubt there will be any show judges crawling on their backs under the car with tape measures. :lol: Once I had the rough template in the car I made some corrections and transferred that to translucent paper. That template still needed some fine tuning before I could transfer the pattern to sheetmetal.

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The rear pans are mirrored so I can flip the pattern and use it for both sides.

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Checking the fit of the right rear pan. It's not in there straight since the outer rear edge needs to be turned down into a flange to fit against the fenderwell. Once that's done it'll slide all the way back into place. I'm 90% finished with the left pan so I can start welding the inner/outer rockers, quarter, and front lower cowl panels in place. The inner/outer rockers sandwich the floor pans so I needed to have all of the pans done before anything else could be welded in for good.

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theastronaut
Posts: 93
Joined: Wed Sep 10, 2014 9:04 am
Location: Anderson SC

Re: 1940 120 Convertible Coupe Restoration

Post by theastronaut » Mon Jul 13, 2015 12:02 pm

With the floor pans mostly roughed in I turned back to the section under the back seat. I had the center section made but needed to make the side pieces. The left side is fabbed and welded in, just started on the right side last week.



I bent the back edges of the floor pans to fit against the rear seat floor section. Also trimmed the rear seat pan to fit up nicely once it's ready to weld in, and drilled holes for the plug welds.

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You can see how the back edge of the floor pan will weld to the inner fenderwell and bottom of the seat pan.

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This is looking into the right quarter panel from the inner fenderwell. The fenderwell should be covering this, so you can't see in... I decided to go ahead and cut this area out since it was in such bad shape and the rear seat pan edges needed to weld to the fenderwell.

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After cutting out the lower front fenderwell and edge of the seat pan. It's amazing that the car didn't collapse in on itself; this was a body mount area that is completely rotted away.

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Made a new seat pan edge.

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Blasted and painted the floor braces with Por15.

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Made a template for the inner fenderwell skin.

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Tinman_70
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Location: Tampa Bay, Florida

Re: 1940 120 Convertible Coupe Restoration

Post by Tinman_70 » Thu Jul 16, 2015 5:49 am

This is a demonstration of some outstanding craftsmanship in replacing the complex rusted panels of this '40 Packard Convertible Coupe! I would guess that few would have attempted the save this car due to the extensive rust damage. I look forward to future progress on this project.

I promise that I will never complain about having to repair the rust on my ’49!
Dare to be Different - Buy and Build Packards!
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theastronaut
Posts: 93
Joined: Wed Sep 10, 2014 9:04 am
Location: Anderson SC

Re: 1940 120 Convertible Coupe Restoration

Post by theastronaut » Wed Jul 29, 2015 7:20 am

Tinman_70 wrote:This is a demonstration of some outstanding craftsmanship in replacing the complex rusted panels of this '40 Packard Convertible Coupe! I would guess that few would have attempted the save this car due to the extensive rust damage. I look forward to future progress on this project.

I promise that I will never complain about having to repair the rust on my ’49!
Appreciate the comment! The owner brought the car from Connecticut to South Carolina to have the metalwork done, there must not have been any shops willing to do it any closer to their home!

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theastronaut
Posts: 93
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Location: Anderson SC

Re: 1940 120 Convertible Coupe Restoration

Post by theastronaut » Wed Jul 29, 2015 7:21 am

I have the right inner fender bottom welded in, and the rear seat pan welded in on the areas that I can get to. I'll have to flip it on the rotisserie to finish welding the middle section, there is about 16" in the middle that I can't reach from the top side.

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With the seat pan in I mocked up the inner/outer rockers and floor pans so I could start on the inner B-pillar brace and finish the outer B-pillar section.

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Bottom half of brace made.

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theastronaut
Posts: 93
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Re: 1940 120 Convertible Coupe Restoration

Post by theastronaut » Tue Aug 11, 2015 9:43 am

Been working on finishing the driver side B-pillar inner brace. I layered three pieces of 1/8" x 3/4" steel to make the 90* turn (didn't have a piece of 3/8" x 5/8" laying around). I thought that a solid piece would be stronger than sheet metal, and that area needs all the help it can get to help keep the quarters in alignment. Just need to do some final trimming to fit it to the car. Making it solid also make it possible to "sculpt" the shape of the "bead" so I could blend from the round lower bead on the floor section to the square upper bead on the B-pillar, matching the appearance of the factory piece.


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Both sides had be previously "repaired" so I only had pictures to go by.

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Picture is from the car we were able to document in GA/NC. His shop is on the state line, not sure what side the car was on. :lol:


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Also have been working on the driver side rocker. I made the front edge too round where it meets the A-pillar, so when I tried to test fit the door the front/bottom edge wouldn't clear. I had to make a couple relief cuts to drop the edge down. No pics but you can see the difference between the original shape and what I originally made. I should have made a template of the corners before I cut everything out. I'll know better on the passenger side...

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theastronaut
Posts: 93
Joined: Wed Sep 10, 2014 9:04 am
Location: Anderson SC

Re: 1940 120 Convertible Coupe Restoration

Post by theastronaut » Tue Aug 18, 2015 4:46 am

The B-pillar bracing pretty much finished up. Had to extend the rocker panel 9" rearward so the outer B-pillar piece had something to weld to along it's outer and upper edges. This was rusted away on the original pieces so I didn't know it should have been longer than I originally made it. Didn't know exactly how it should look so I just made it functional, it won't be seen once the outer piece is welded on. Also pulled the rear floor pan back out to recess the area under the inner B-pillar brace. The rocker extension also had to be recessed.

I should have everything for the left side finished this week so I can pull it all out for cleaning/priming. Then it'll be ready to be welded in. All I'm missing now is one rear body mount brace at the rear inner fender; I started on it yesterday. Also need to blast the original rear floor pan braces, hopefully they'll be nice enough that I won't need to make new ones.


Top half extended.

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Floor pan and rocker recessed so the B-pillar brace sits flat.

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Fitting the outer B-pillar piece.

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theastronaut
Posts: 93
Joined: Wed Sep 10, 2014 9:04 am
Location: Anderson SC

Re: 1940 120 Convertible Coupe Restoration

Post by theastronaut » Thu Aug 20, 2015 9:59 am

Started on the last piece of the driver side, the fenderwell/floor brace for the body mount at the end of the inner rocker. Still need to finish it up so I don't have any progress pictures but it's roughly shaped. I'll wait to do the final shaping once the rest of the panels are back in for good.

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Pulled everything back out, then either blasted the parts or cleaned them with PPG DX579 and DX520 before spraying PPG DPLF epoxy. I'll start welding everything in next week.


Don't think I mentioned it before but I made a stainless table top for the bead roller. It's hinged at the back so it can be moved out of the way for round parts, and it's height adjustable to compensate for different bead depths.

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theastronaut
Posts: 93
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Re: 1940 120 Convertible Coupe Restoration

Post by theastronaut » Wed Aug 26, 2015 7:20 am

One thing nobody likes to do is attempt to reassemble a car that another person took apart. Parts are usually scattered out, hardware is misplaced, labled wrong, or completly missing. Even if everything is there you still didn't take it apart yourself to really see how it was assembled. Since I wasn't familiar at all with Packards I was thinking that this could be a huge problem with the build when we first considered the job... thankfully I couldn't have been more wrong.

The owner completly documented the car before and while it was being dissasembled. All of the parts are in boxes that are labeled with the contents, and inside each box are all of the needed parts and hardware for that respective part of the car. There are full size color pictures in each box of how the parts go together- no guesswork involved. Many of the parts are already restored, with new hardware included, ready to bolt on and go. This will save countless hours once we start the reassembly. It's already been helpful with the few things we've needed while doing the metalwork. The owner definitely wins the "best customer ever" award for having everything organized to this level of detail.


I needed to make sure that the seat mounting brackets were in the correct location before welding in the floor pans. So I pulled out the seat frame and "seats" box, and found already-stripped/painted seat tracks, new hardware, and clear pictures of how they're assembled. Had it together quickly since I didn't have to hunt for random parts scattered in boxes.

I also double checked the location and height of the floor braces. All of the body mounts are shimmed with the same amount of spacers to keep the body braces level with the frame. This will make it easier to mount the body for the final time- no guessing with how many shims go in each location. It's all solid mounted with no rubber bushings at this point, hopefully this will help the body to remain in the correct alignment once the bracing is cut out.

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The driver side seat bracket had alignment holes through the floor braces on both ends so I went ahead and welded it to the cross braces. The passenger side didn't have any way to locate it so I bolted the seat tracks and seat frame in the car and positioned the right side with clamps to hold the passenger seat bracket. Tested the tracks to make sure they weren't in a bind, then welded the passenger brace in and coated the top side of the braces with POR15. Took a little extra time to fit it all up but there won't be any surprises later once the seat is upholstered and ready to bolt in.

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I've started re-fitting the panels so I can mark the spot weld locations. I like to prime the panels, then mark and grind the primer off only where the spot weld will be. This keeps more of the seams protected from rust in the future.

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Used the patterns I made earlier to mark the location of the convertible top ram bracket.

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