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Re: 1940 120 Convertible Coupe Restoration

Posted: Tue Feb 23, 2016 7:09 am
by theastronaut
Tinman_70 wrote:It's great to see a car emerging as you start putting all your expertly made parts together! As usual, great job!

Joe
Thanks Joe!!

Re: 1940 120 Convertible Coupe Restoration

Posted: Tue Feb 23, 2016 7:09 am
by theastronaut
I have the rocker, inner and outer B-pillar pieces, and the lower cowl panel welded in.

Next step is to get the lower quarter panel fitted and welded in, then start leading the seams. To position the quarter I set the door in place to match quarter bottom to the door bottom and make sure the bottom edge carried the same line. The edge of the door (black) was blending into the black frame so I added blue tape to the edges of both panels to help visualize the line better.

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Fitting and finishing the cowl panel:

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B-pillar brace.

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Rocker in:

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Re: 1940 120 Convertible Coupe Restoration

Posted: Tue Feb 23, 2016 7:10 am
by theastronaut
Since the door was out I took a few pictures. You might want to make sure there are no children around when you scroll down, it's pretty scary... :shock:

They're patched up so bad that they won't fully fit in the door jamb without hitting the rockers. Now it makes sense that the old rockers were bashed in and bondo'd as bad as they were. Like the rest of the body, the door is fixable with enough work but it would make more sense to just start with a better door if we can find one.


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And that's just the bottom... the middle of the inner skin somehow rotted out. Very unusual place to have rust holes.

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If that wasn't bad enough, most of the inner front edge is rusted through.

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Re: 1940 120 Convertible Coupe Restoration

Posted: Thu Feb 25, 2016 7:55 am
by Tinman_70
John,

WOW! Someone did an awful (!) lot of brazing on the door :o . Do you have to find a roadster door or are other models similar enough to give you a starting point to fabricate the repair? I'm sure you'll figure something out.

Joe

Re: 1940 120 Convertible Coupe Restoration

Posted: Tue Mar 01, 2016 9:56 am
by theastronaut
I'm pretty sure a coupe door would work with minimal modification. It looks like the original doors were modified at the factory by cutting the window frame off, welding caps in place, and leading over the caps. That would be much simpler than fabricating 1/3rd of the original door.

Re: 1940 120 Convertible Coupe Restoration

Posted: Tue Mar 08, 2016 12:58 pm
by theastronaut
I'm back in from the "Redneck Roundup" metalshaping get-together in Rock Hill. This was a three day gathering of 40-45 people from all over the United States, plus Per "MetalmanSweden" from Sweden, and another talented metalshaper, Ben Van Berlo from Holland. I made new friends and learned a lot from watching the other guys work on their projects and the various presentations throughout the weekend. Great bunch of people and I hope to attend again next year.


One of the things I learned more about was the "flexible shape pattern". I've seen pictures of them posted on the allmetalshaping.com forums but didn't know anything about them. One of the presentations on Friday included a brief discussion on them so I thought that the passenger side fenderwell lip would be a good place to try one out.


The concept is to use reinforced shipping tape to make a non-deforming yet flexible pattern that shows how much shape a panel has so you can accurately determine how much shrinking or streching the panel needs. It also helps determine if an area of a panel has bends only- no stretching/shrinking needed to arrive at that particular shape.
I used a layer of blue painters tape as the first layer, being careful not to overlap anywhere. Then I used a single layer of reinforced tape on the spots I thought would need to be stretched, and a double layer (at opposing angles) on the area that I though was only bent- the inner flange. Once it's pulled off the panel (the painters tape makes it easy to remove) you use baby powder to kill the adhesive so it can be handled without it sticking to everything.



I didn't get a picture of it before I had removed it and used baby powder on it so I taped it back in place for a quick pic.

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It doesn't look like much pulled off until you weigh down the spots that will lay completely flat, in this case the inner edge. If it will easily lay down with no wrinkels or bucking you know that that area only needs bending to arrive at its final form.

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The ruffles along the outer edge won't lay flat. You can see that there is "more" tape for that section than a straight/flat piece so the new metal needs to be stretched in that area.

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I cut a blank out, using the flat section of the tape pattern to mark out the inner flange's curve. I probably would have made this in a straight section and used the brake to make the first bend, then stretched and shrunk each side to curve it. With the shape pattern, I already had the correct curve of the flange so I could go ahead and cut it to shape. Once the piece was cut out, I set up the bead roller with mis-matched dies to make a makeshift tipping die to get the curved bend started.


Initial bend and stretching.

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I had some leftover 1/8" plate in the scrap pile that had the same radius as the fender opening. I smoothed the edge and bent it to the same shape as the opening so I could use it as a dolly to form the edge over. This supported the edge, and a piece of tubing hammered beside it made the flared edge.

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It's roughed in, still needs some fine tuning to match the shape of the opening, and to match the proper gradual increase in flare from top to bottom.

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Re: 1940 120 Convertible Coupe Restoration

Posted: Tue Mar 08, 2016 12:59 pm
by theastronaut
To finish up the quarter panel edge I made a set of templates off the driver side to match up the shape.

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Before and after fine tuning the shape. The templates were spaced every two inches.

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Fit to the quarter panel:

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Shape matches the original panel:

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Started repairing the inner fenderwell so I'll have a clean flange for the quarter to weld to.

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Re: 1940 120 Convertible Coupe Restoration

Posted: Wed Mar 23, 2016 4:18 am
by theastronaut
I have started on the rear half of the inner fenderwell. There is a dip in the upper part of the fenderwell lip and I want both the front and rear to be solid before I go about straightening that out.

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I used the "dirty thumb" method of making a template for the shape of the lower edge.

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New piece welded in.

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Re: 1940 120 Convertible Coupe Restoration

Posted: Wed Mar 23, 2016 4:19 am
by theastronaut
The rear inner body mount brace was in bad shape along the bottom so I made a new section to repair it. I had added a couple temporary braces to hold the back of the car in place as the brace had become weak and sagged with the weight of the body on it.


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I mentioned flexible shape patterns earlier so I'll show how I made it and how to read it once it's made. Start by adding a layer of painters tape, its not as ridged as other tapes and the weaker adhesive makes it easy to remove.

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Then add a layer of reinforced shipping tape. I also added a second layer with the strands turned 90* to the first layer so that the tape can't stretch later when it's removed.

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Peel it off and sprinkle the adhesive side with baby powder to reduce the adhesive's grip. You can see that it retains the shape of the part.

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Now the pattern can be laid flat on a countertop to see exactly what areas will need stretching or shrinking. One thing to note- areas that only need bending will lay flat as well, such as the side of the pattern with the raised bead pressed in. That side lays flat because that shape is only bent in one direction (the same way you'd fold a piece of paper). Only the areas needing shrinking or stretching (compound curves) will show up in the pattern. There are two spots sticking up right in the middle of the bend. This show how much and where the metal needs to be stretched to attain the correct shape on the new panel. Knowing exactly where and how much to stretch/shrink saves time and guesswork when you start to make the new piece.


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Re: 1940 120 Convertible Coupe Restoration

Posted: Wed Mar 23, 2016 4:19 am
by theastronaut
The finished brace, and I made a new section of the rear inner fender.

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