1938 1608

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Bluedevil
Posts: 245
Joined: Fri Oct 05, 2018 7:07 am

1938 1608

Post by Bluedevil » Tue Apr 09, 2019 4:04 pm

I am starting to replace the roof in my recently acquired 38 Twelve. The car came out of 46 year storage with the rare aftermarket sun roof.

Apparently there had been a short in the one of the dome lights causing the top to at least smolder. There was charred wood and nothing else. (original top as removed).

I disassembled it and used the original pieces as a pattern. Where the would was missing or warped (banding tool) I use a piece of steel strapping to duplicate the curves. I am in the steel business and the strapping is very readily available. It is flexible and easy to create an arch. Fasten each end and place a block in the middle to set the height and trace the curve.
Attachments
Packard roof.jpg
Original top as removed
Roofreplacement.jpg
banding tool

Bluedevil
Posts: 245
Joined: Fri Oct 05, 2018 7:07 am

Re: 1938 1608

Post by Bluedevil » Tue Apr 09, 2019 4:22 pm

The next problem was how to attach the bows to the side rails.

The original bows were attached by mortise and tenon (roof2 002). This either requires a mortising machine, which I don't have or a lot of precise chiseling. I decided against this method.

The second option was to cut a tenon on the bows as original and then groove the full length of the side rail. This would allow you to slide the bows wherever you needed to. Once spaced, you could place locking strips in the groove between the bows. Since I had the exact locations, I decided I didn't need that flexibility. (roof2 001).

I finall decided to use a forstner bit and cut a rounded end mortise. (roof2 003). This makes it easier to get the tenons on the bows in the mortises.

I am in the middle or restoring a 1946 Century Seamaid, dual cockpit mahogany runabout (boat) and am using 3M 5200 marine adhesive. It is the consistency of tacky toothpaste, is waterproof, takes 7 days to harden, allowing you time to make adjustments, and is so strong when cured that the wood will fail before the joint.

Here is the loosely assembled roof (roof3 001). Ran out of progress and picture for the time being. Back to the engine.
Attachments
Roof2 002.jpg
Roof2 001.jpg
Roof2 003.jpg
roof3 001.jpg

Adam
Posts: 1107
Joined: Fri Sep 04, 2009 4:15 am
Location: lincolnshire, uk

Re: 1938 1608

Post by Adam » Wed Apr 10, 2019 4:30 am

Nice work!!

Can I ask what sort of wood you are using?

I see you also have a Morgan to play with in your shed...
"Do not underestimate the English cousin.....they are not as stupid as they look!" - Signor Altabani in The Italian Job.

Bluedevil
Posts: 245
Joined: Fri Oct 05, 2018 7:07 am

Re: 1938 1608

Post by Bluedevil » Wed Apr 10, 2019 5:27 am

Adam,

Thank you for the kind words.

I am using a combination of quartersawn white oak and ash. Oak for load areas and ash for impact, door post and the like. I have both in stock for the Morgans and my boat.

After 110years of ownership, I see you have allowed Charles to sell Morgan to the Italians!!! Is nothing sacred?

Keen eye. That is a '65 +4 to Super Sport specs. I sold my real SS and decided to duplicate it. Also lurking in the background is a '57 +4 DHC and a '73 +8. The Morgan weighs about what the load is on one wheel of the Twelve.

Bill

Adam
Posts: 1107
Joined: Fri Sep 04, 2009 4:15 am
Location: lincolnshire, uk

Re: 1938 1608

Post by Adam » Fri Apr 12, 2019 4:44 am

Ah, interesting about the choice of timber.

Yes, I hope the new investors see the value in keeping the character of Morgan as it is.

What an interesting fleet of moggies. Are the others on the road? The plus 8 sounds like lots of fun. Does it have the Moss box?

Sorry for the forum thread creep!

Adam..
"Do not underestimate the English cousin.....they are not as stupid as they look!" - Signor Altabani in The Italian Job.

Bluedevil
Posts: 245
Joined: Fri Oct 05, 2018 7:07 am

Re: 1938 1608

Post by Bluedevil » Fri Apr 12, 2019 5:31 am

Adam,

Ash has greater impact strength, that is why they make baseball bats from it. The quarter sawn Oak is more stable in the thinner thickness for the roof sides and bows of the top and is more rot resistant in case there is a water leak, which I hope doesn't happen.

Building bodies for the DHC and +8. 8 has LT77 5 speed upgrade.

Used to do Jaguars, when my namesake owned them. When Sir William departed, the character of the company changed and I went in other directions. Hope that doesn't happen at MMC.

My neighbor is headed your way for the Goodwood Festival of Speed. He invited me along, but afraid it isn't in the cards this year.

Bill

Adam
Posts: 1107
Joined: Fri Sep 04, 2009 4:15 am
Location: lincolnshire, uk

Re: 1938 1608

Post by Adam » Thu Apr 18, 2019 6:37 am

Thanks for the info. Very interesting.

I must get to the Goodwood Festival myself, one of these years. I have never been.
"Do not underestimate the English cousin.....they are not as stupid as they look!" - Signor Altabani in The Italian Job.

Bluedevil
Posts: 245
Joined: Fri Oct 05, 2018 7:07 am

Re: 1938 1608

Post by Bluedevil » Sun Feb 23, 2020 2:09 pm

I have been busy removing the front end Sheetmetal and radiator. I decide to pull the engine and go thru everything and install new gaskets, rings, hardware and paint. I use a 2 ton cherry picker and a leveler and it took about 15 min. Here is the empty bay.
Attachments
Packard engine pull.jpg

Bluedevil
Posts: 245
Joined: Fri Oct 05, 2018 7:07 am

Re: 1938 1608

Post by Bluedevil » Sun Feb 23, 2020 2:10 pm

View from the front. I had to remove the steering box to get clearance.
Attachments
Packard engine pull2.jpg

Bluedevil
Posts: 245
Joined: Fri Oct 05, 2018 7:07 am

Re: 1938 1608

Post by Bluedevil » Sun Feb 23, 2020 2:12 pm

I removed the bell housing studs and clutch and pressure plate and sat it on the bellhousing end. lot of sludge in the pan but the upper crank case looks great. This picture references the oiling system
Attachments
Packard oiling sytsem.jpg

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