packard 115c coupe convertible

General topics, not covered elsewhere, of all things Packard.
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packard115c
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packard 115c coupe convertible

Post by packard115c » Mon Jul 20, 2009 9:32 am

does any one know how many 1937 115c coupe convertibles were made, how many still exist, and the correct weight of these cars.
thanks

Dave Czirr
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Re: packard 115c coupe convertible

Post by Dave Czirr » Mon Jul 20, 2009 11:00 am

The weight of the 1937 Packard six convertible coupe is given in the owner's manual as 3285 lbs, a very light car indeed. If you're going to keep and enjoy your car, I suggest you buy a reprint of the owner's manual which does provide important maintenance information, also pick up a shop manual and parts manual, reprints of which are commonly available.

It was only postwar that Packard kept records of production by actual body type, prewar they only recorded production by chassis. Model year production for the six-cylinder chassis was 65,400; the only way to know how many of those were body style 1089 (the 115C convertible coupe) is by finding the highest serial-numbered car. I believe the sequential production number in 1937 started at 101, so if I recall this correctly and you found vehicle# 1089-101 it would be the first one made; if you found 1089-2601, it would be the 2500th made and you'd know that at least that many were made. The highest number I'm personally aware of is 1089-1657 and I'd make a pure guess that the six convertible was almost certainly less than 10% of the total sixes made. As to how many still exist, you could get an estimate by counting the numbers of them listed in the directories of the two major Packard clubs, and of course not double-counting for those who may belong to both clubs. I see about 35 1089s listed in this club's directory; you could perhaps make a wild guess and say that, adding those owned by non-members, those yet to be discovered or rusting away in a garage, or those under restoration or kept as parts cars might double that number - but that's pure speculation on my part.

If your car has a higher number than 1657, I'd very much like to have the number and the large embossed number (thief-proof number) on the cowl. You can PM me if you wish to keep the information private. Thanks.

packard115c
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Re: packard 115c coupe convertible

Post by packard115c » Mon Jul 20, 2009 1:38 pm

the # on mine is 1089-1589 the cowl # is 3II462 it was bought new at the SCHOTT MOTOR CO in cinciniti ohio 11/19/1936

Dave Czirr
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Re: packard 115c coupe convertible

Post by Dave Czirr » Mon Jul 20, 2009 4:32 pm

You didn't indicate on your profile where you live, but if near Ohio are you aware that the Packard Museum meet all this week at Warren OH is focusing on the 1937 Packards? They hope to field one of each of the nearly 40 models and body styles produced in 1937, and no doubt you'd find a lot of 1937 enthusiasts there.

packard115c
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Re: packard 115c coupe convertible

Post by packard115c » Tue Jul 21, 2009 1:52 am

thanks for the info, i live in east tennessee. i had my packard weighed, it weighed in at 3920. look at the difference in the weights of packards from 1930 to 1936 they were listed as a lot heavier than the cars from 1936 to 1940. the later cars were a lot bigger so how could they weigh less?

just thought this was interesting.

Dave Czirr
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Re: packard 115c coupe convertible

Post by Dave Czirr » Tue Jul 21, 2009 5:16 am

First, the later cars weren't "a lot" bigger than the earlier cars, they were generally smaller. Check wheelbases and other dimensions to convince yourself. For example in 1934 the shortest car (a "senior" Eight sedan, weight 4640 lbs) had a 129 inch wheelbase versus the following year's 120 with a 120 inch wheelbase, and in 1937 your car even less at 115 inches. In 1938-39 the senior cars had 134 and 139 inch wheelbases, while the juniors (except the 7 passenger models) had a 127 inch wheelbase. Overall lengths will be less different after the adoption of independent suspension (1937 in the senior cars) as there was a bit more overhang front and rear.

Secondly, you've got to separate the "junior" cars from the seniors; seniors up thru 1938 (and the Twelve thru 1939) were built of heavy, composite construction, wood-framed and steel skinned, whereas the the juniors with the exceptions of a few minor pieces were essentially simple and much lighter, all-steel bodies. Seniors had much heavier engines, drivelines and frames, though these differences began to merge by 1939. By the time you hit 1940 both series were essentiall all-steel bodies and the juniors and seniors shared many body panels and in some cases had the same wheelbases, thus they were considerably lighter and the weight differences between the two merged closer together.

As to the difference between the listed weight of your car and what you got when you actually had it weighed, I can't explain the entire difference but the listed weight was generally the "shipping weight" which excluded gasoline and other items. Also it probably excluded optional items like sidemounted spares, heaters, and the like.

packard115c
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Re: packard 115c coupe convertible

Post by packard115c » Tue Jul 21, 2009 6:11 am

thanks , this sheds some light on the subject for me. i am new to the packard scene, but i really enjoy the car. i have had a 1934 ford, 1931ford, 1934 dodge that i still have. but nothing compares to the PACKARD for driveability and comfort. the dodge comes close as it is a 4dr DR SEDAN.IT WAS THE FIRST YEAR FOR INDEPENDENT SUSPENSION FOR DODGE.

Dave Czirr
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Re: packard 115c coupe convertible

Post by Dave Czirr » Tue Jul 21, 2009 8:29 am

Glad you're enjoying your first Packard, hope to see you here often and I hope you get involved in some PAC activities like National Meets, tours, and local regions. Back on the main website you'll find a list of local regions, by all means find one near you and join, it will enhance your enjoyment immensely.

As to the "driveability" of your car, Packard of course built their reputation on the high end of the luxury market where they were the most successful by a large margin for many years. The depression forced them as a survival issue to enter the middle and lower middle (the Six) price range which ultimately may have tarnished their reputation, but until the Senior cars went to independent suspension (1937) and hydraulic brakes, many would say the juniors were the more driveable cars, certainly more nimble.

There are some really find books on Packard, perhaps you should pick up one or two. Turquist's is the first and very good, the Automobile Quarterly tome edited by Bev Kimes is probably the gold standard but there are many others that are enjoyable as well.

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