Oil Filter Lines

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Dwight Bedsole
Posts: 61
Joined: Mon Jan 20, 2020 4:01 pm

Oil Filter Lines

Post by Dwight Bedsole » Mon Mar 30, 2020 8:42 am

I have recently purchased a 1937 Packard 120 C 4 door sedan convertible that has been sitting up for +15 years and needs a lot of work. I am in the process of redoing brakes, fuel system, etc. The inlet and exit oil filter lines were rubber with brass fittings. The oil lines are completely rotten. I noticed that the brass fitting on the lower line that attaches to the crankcase has a very small opening that appears to be a restricting orifice while the other fittings are normal flared fittings. Does anyone know of a source for the lines? I could fabricate out of copper and flare the ends but I am concerned about finding the restricting orifice fitting.
Thanks
Dwight

Howard56
Posts: 1306
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2012 11:35 am

Re: Oil Filter Lines

Post by Howard56 » Mon Apr 06, 2020 10:42 am

With the lack of response I would imagine the optional filters on a 37 were not that common so not that many are familiar with them. In the accessory photo and on later engines I believe Packard always used steel lines on factory installed filters so with yours having hoses it is probably an aftermarket install. If flackmaster cannot name a source or has any used factory lines I would expect it will be up to you to make them. You might try sizing the Purolator orifice with number drills to get an approximate opening size to duplicate using a modern fitting.

For what it is worth, some service articles mention a restriction in the brass filter fittings that were used in later engines. No idea if the same filter setup could be retrofitted or was used on a 37 but a later bulletin mentions some fittings were drilled out to as large as a #27 drill. Not pertinent to your engine as such other than orifice size but Packard had issues with the original plumbing layout and made several changes with flow on filters used with later hydraulic lifter engines. If plumbing is the same on a 37 solid lifter engines as it was in the pre change versions used on later engines the #27 hole size or the aftermarket Purolator size should be OK. Per the attached article, on those engines with the large hole and hydraulic lifters, Packard recommended mechanics resize back to a 47 drill or order a special fitting from the factory. I doubt any of those fittings are available today but on a later bulletin issued during the war having similar info, Packard recommended mechanics fill the larger opening with solder and drill thru the solder with the proper size drill. If no one has a better idea then using solder in a modern commercially available fitting might be a viable option.

Assuming the 37 filter is plumbed similarly to the 40 and later engines, the final change made approx 10% of oil flow go thru the filter and back into the crankcase with hydraulic lifers, or return to the engine via the lifter gallery with solid lifters. The remaining 90% went directly thru the engine and that ratio was used on both solid and hydraulic lifter engines.
Attachments
filter.jpg
article.jpg

Dave Czirr
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Re: Oil Filter Lines

Post by Dave Czirr » Mon Apr 06, 2020 12:39 pm

It wasn't until 1938 that the lifters on the "120" engine were pressure lubricated. On the 1937 engine they are lubricated by splash and mist.

Dwight Bedsole
Posts: 61
Joined: Mon Jan 20, 2020 4:01 pm

Re: Oil Filter Lines

Post by Dwight Bedsole » Fri Apr 10, 2020 9:01 am

Howard, Dave - thanks for the response.

It appears from the photos on page 187 of my Motor's Auto Repair Manual that the oil filter is a FRAM 35 - by-pass type oil filter and I assume the restricting orifice is to restrict oil flow to the filter so as not to take away too much oil from the journals, etc.. Howard I took your suggestion and sized the orifice with a 1/16" drill bit, good suggestion to fill copper fitting with solder and drill out. I may see if my tractor supply house that makes up hydraulic hoses can make up two hoses. Is the filter element a re-useable element ?

Thanks
Dwight

Howard56
Posts: 1306
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2012 11:35 am

Re: Oil Filter Lines

Post by Howard56 » Fri Apr 10, 2020 11:07 am

I have no idea what element your filter takes but all the Packard factory supplied filters from at least 40 on had replaceable elements. I cannot tell if the top of the Purolator canister comes off in the 37 factory accessory photo so no idea if it was like the earlier filters in which elements were not separately replaceable (or maybe some were replaceable but not a simple drop in like later elements). You might see if your Fram canister lid comes off easily and if the element lifts out. If so take some measurements or take the filter element to Napa and see if they can match the dimensions. The Napa 1080 or Wix 51080 was used in postwar cars up thru 54 and might fit the earlier canisters so maybe a good starting point to compare measurements.

Dwight Bedsole
Posts: 61
Joined: Mon Jan 20, 2020 4:01 pm

Re: Oil Filter Lines

Post by Dwight Bedsole » Mon Apr 13, 2020 9:18 am

Howard, attached is photo of the Fram F 35 canister (disassembled) and internal filter element. I will see what NAPA has to offer. Oil flow is inlet from side ; drain out bottom center.

Could not attached photo - told that file was too large

Thanks
Dwight

Howard56
Posts: 1306
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2012 11:35 am

Re: Oil Filter Lines

Post by Howard56 » Mon Apr 13, 2020 12:36 pm

The file size limits are fairly small on this forum. The forum at Packardinfo accepts larger photos. If you need a file reducing program Irfanview is a free Windows program that is fairly easy to use that will reduce the overall size and the built in Photos app on MacOS will do the job there. Have not used my iPhone for any photo work so not sure if the same Photos app on IOS will do the job or if you may need to download a program from the app store. There are a couple of free or minimal cost programs available for IOS that can do the job though. No idea what is available for Android phones.

The postwar Packard filters changed the bottom inlet to the side also so your aftermarket install may have been done postwar. In addition to the Napa 1080 the 55-6 models used a Napa 1006. Dimensions are slightly different from the 1080 and maybe worth a check too.

Dwight Bedsole
Posts: 61
Joined: Mon Jan 20, 2020 4:01 pm

Re: Oil Filter Lines

Post by Dwight Bedsole » Mon Apr 13, 2020 12:55 pm

Howard thanks for the info.

Dwight Bedsole
Posts: 61
Joined: Mon Jan 20, 2020 4:01 pm

Re: Oil Filter Lines

Post by Dwight Bedsole » Mon Oct 26, 2020 10:19 am

Howard,

I have since determined that the engine in my 1937 120c is not a 1937 straight 8. I discovered a casting date of November 7, 1945 on right rear of block so I am assuming the engine is a 1946 straight eight. I do not know what engine it is because there is no engine no. on the boss on upper left side of the engine block. I was told that it was common for engine replacements done by a Packard dealer to not have an identification no. in the boss. All I know about the engine is that it has a crankcase capacity of 5 1/2 qts. which says it is not Supper Clipper 2103 or a Custom Super Clipper 2106 or 2126 (7 qts.).

So back to the question of oil lines to the filter, do you know if the 1946 8 engines that had fully pressurized oil systems relied on restricting orifices in the oil line to the filter to maintain proper oil pressure to the lifters? I plan to plumb the oil filter with 1/8" (rubber grease hose lines) and need to know if I need a restriction in the feed line inlet to the filter and if so what dia./dill size.

I have not started the car so do not know if valves are sticking or tappets are noisy, etc., I have spent these last few months since purchasing the car getting it ready to run - "hopefully after 15 years of sitting up " - (gas tank cleaned/sealed/repaired, new brake system, new fuel lines/electric fuel pump, rebuilt carb/distributor/generator, dropped the pan removed sludge cleaned the filter (no I did not know at the time that counting the bearings would help identify the engine). When I install new spark plugs I plan to squirt some Marvel Mistery Oil to lubricate the upper cylinders/valves - any suggestions on how best to wake her up ?

Thanks
Dwight

Howard56
Posts: 1306
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2012 11:35 am

Re: Oil Filter Lines

Post by Howard56 » Tue Oct 27, 2020 9:18 am

Your engine is most likely the 282 which was used thru the 47 models. With the introduction of the 22nd series 48s and thru 54, the 288/327 block took its place. The 2103 Super and 2106 Custom Clippers you mention had the 356 engine which is completely different. The 282 would have been on the Clipper 8 series from 41-47 and I believe, but won't swear to it, that it was the same engine also used on the 120 models starting around 36.

The engines did have full pressure lube. The outlet from the oil pump is at the bottom port and if there is no filter that oil is then piped back into the upper port via a short pigtail to go back into the engine and to the valve lifter gallery. The filter (if equipped) is plumbed into those ports and replaces the pigtail placing the filter in series with the lifters. This works for solid lifters but was found to be problematic on the prewar 356 with hydraulic lifters so a change was made for those and all later engines with hydraulic lifters.

Here is the Packard suggested oil filter line routing for the engine. This is from a postwar service article so the difference is the postwar filters had the oil supply inlet on the side while the prewar filters had the inlet on the bottom. Some but not all filter canisters were stamped as to which port is the inlet and outlet so you would plumb yours accordingly.

Since you had the pan off and cleaned any sludge that part is done. The only other suggestion I would have before starting is to prime the oil pump and pre lube the engine by getting an inexpensive transfer pump from Harbor Freight or the like. Use it to place a quart or two of oil directly into the oil pump and passages to the bearings. You can do that by buying a fitting and opening the bottom port to connect the hand pump. Push a quart or two into the pump and passages and when full remove the fitting and replace any plumbing you might have disconnected to install the fitting.
Attachments
filter.jpg
pump.jpg

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