1947 Removal of Brake Drums

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edward
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1947 Removal of Brake Drums

Post by edward » Tue Nov 24, 2009 2:50 am

I need to do some brake work and understand there is a special tool to remove the brake drums. Can I make this tool, Any suggestions for removal or what?

Dave Czirr
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Re: 1947 Removal of Brake Drums

Post by Dave Czirr » Tue Nov 24, 2009 6:31 am

You'll find a thread just a few posts below yours titled "Rear Brake Drum Removal". Check that out first, and you'll see a picture of a typical drum removing tool. As they exert considerable force and used forged parts, making such a tool is going to be outside of the capabilities of most of us, but they are not uncommon and I'd bet if you ask around, you'll find one to borrow or rent. Need for this tool was not particular to Packards.

If you've still got problems, let us know.

Adam
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Re: 1947 Removal of Brake Drums

Post by Adam » Tue Nov 24, 2009 6:34 am

The front brake drums will come off by removing the outer front wheel bearing, by removing the castellated nut and split pin.

The rear drums are fitted on a taper with a key way. First you will need to undo the castellated nut and split pin. This is best done with the car still on the ground and wheel on to hold the halfshaft from rotating. With the nut removed you will need a hub puller. These are either a screwthread, or hydraulic puller (mine is a sykes-pickavant hydraulic one) with five "fingers" which are bolted behind the wheel bolts. The puller then acts against the end of the half shaft (keep the nut loosely in place for that to avoid damage) and the drum will pull off (hopefully). Usually they are fine, but I have had to use heat on the outside of the taper before now to shift it.

The type of puller has been covered elsewhere on this forum. They are quite expensive, so unless you are going to use it often, you may be better off borrowing one. Any decent auto workshop should have one.

When refitting the drum onto the taper, clean the taper and key steel with wet or dry paper (emery paper) and reassemble dry. But do use copper grease on the thread on the end of the halfshaft. Which does not need to be amazingly tight. Sorry, do not have a torque setting. :D

Adam..


Edited to add:- I think Dave beat me to it with the answer to this!
"Do not underestimate the English cousin.....they are not as stupid as they look!" - Signor Altabani in The Italian Job.

Dave Czirr
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Re: 1947 Removal of Brake Drums

Post by Dave Czirr » Tue Nov 24, 2009 7:12 am

Adam, thanks for chiming in, your input is most welcome. We need more contributors like yourself that "have been there and done that".

But I would disagree with your comments about grease on the thread end (if you meant the taper itself) and that the nut doesn't have to be tight. For those years that Packard issued torque specifications, those for the axle nut varied between 200 and 270 lbs-ft. and leaving them insufficient tight has been associated with axle breakage at the thread. And Packard's recommendations as well as those of Chrysler and others using this type of construction, and good engineering practices say the taper itself should be clean and dry.

edward
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Re: 1947 Removal of Brake Drums

Post by edward » Wed Nov 25, 2009 6:07 pm

Thanks, I really appreciate the information and assistance.

Adam
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Location: lincolnshire, uk

Re: 1947 Removal of Brake Drums

Post by Adam » Wed Dec 02, 2009 7:33 am

Dave

I just found your comments on the halfshaft tapers. I did mean that the taper should be dry. I was only recommending copper grease on the thread. I have a fetish for copper grease on all threads (except commercial vehicle wheel wheel nuts and internal engine bolts, which get just engine oil).

I must admit to never having a torque setting for these, only ensuring that they are "tight enough" so that they do not move on the taper, which would be a firm pull on a 24 inch bar! I know....not very good engineering!!!!

I have known the tapers to be so tight that I have wound up the hydraulic puller as much as possible, than had to heat the outside of the taper until red. When it finally cracked loose, the drum and puller were propelled across the workshop!! Best to stand out of the way! Now I always keep the nut on loosely until it is cracked.

Adam..
"Do not underestimate the English cousin.....they are not as stupid as they look!" - Signor Altabani in The Italian Job.

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